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I'm using DataContractJsonSerializer, which likes to output to a Stream. I want to top-and-tail the outputs of the serializer so I was using a StreamWriter to alternately write in the extra bits I needed.

var ser = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof (TValue));

using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
{   
    using (var sw = new StreamWriter(stream))
    {
        sw.Write("{");

        foreach (var kvp in keysAndValues)
        {
            sw.Write("'{0}':", kvp.Key);
            ser.WriteObject(stream, kvp.Value);
        }

        sw.Write("}");
    }

    using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(stream))
    {
        return streamReader.ReadToEnd();
    }
}

When I do this I get an ArgumentException "Stream was not readable".

I'm probably doing all sorts wrong here so all answers welcome. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I assume your first foreach in the example is an accidental copy paste error? – ShuggyCoUk Aug 5 '09 at 10:50
    
Yep - removed it now. – Gaz Aug 5 '09 at 11:25
up vote 56 down vote accepted

Three things:

  • Don't close the StreamWriter. That will close the MemoryStream. You do need to flush the writer though.
  • Reset the position of the stream before reading.
  • If you're going to write directly to the stream, you need to flush the writer first.

So:

using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
{
    var sw = new StreamWriter(stream);
    sw.Write("{");

    foreach (var kvp in keysAndValues)
    {
        sw.Write("'{0}':", kvp.Key);
        sw.Flush();
        ser.WriteObject(stream, kvp.Value);
    }    
    sw.Write("}");            
    sw.Flush();
    stream.Position = 0;

    using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(stream))
    {
        return streamReader.ReadToEnd();
    }
}

There's another simpler alternative though. All you're doing with the stream when reading is converting it into a string. You can do that more simply:

return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(stream.GetBuffer(), 0, stream.Length);

You can do that after closing the stream, so it doesn't matter if the StreamWriter closes it.

I'm concerned by you writing directly to the the stream - what is ser? Is it an XML serializer, or a binary one? If it's binary, your model is somewhat flawed - you shouldn't mix binary and text data without being very careful about it. If it's XML, you may find that you end up with byte-order marks in the middle of your string, which could be problematic.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon. It's a DataContractJsonSerializer. I've edited the code now to show that. Does that make what I'm doing OK? – Gaz Aug 5 '09 at 11:03
1  
didn't think of just grabbing the buffer - nice one – ShuggyCoUk Aug 5 '09 at 11:04
1  
that sounds like you aren't getting the flushing right. did you add all the flush calls in Jon's example? – ShuggyCoUk Aug 5 '09 at 11:36
1  
Amen for sw.Flush();. I was going nuts trying to figure out why the MemoryStream had no data inspite of writing to it! – Karthic Raghupathi Apr 15 '13 at 4:48
3  
This is the only way it worked for me. I could not get the Encoding.UTF8.GetString() method to work. It said that it would not work with a closed stream. – wbinford Jun 12 '13 at 21:07

setting the memory streams position to the beginning might help.

 stream.Position = 0;

But the core problem is that the StreamWriter is closing your memory stream when it is closed.

Simply flushing that stream where you end the using block for it and only disposing of it fter you have read the data out of the memory stream will solve this for you.

You may also want to consider using a StringWriter instead...

using (var writer = new StringWriter())
{
    using (var sw = new StreamWriter(stream))
    {
        sw.Write("{");

        foreach (var kvp in keysAndValues)
        {
            sw.Write("'{0}':", kvp.Key);
            ser.WriteObject(writer, kvp.Value);
        }
        sw.Write("}");
    }

    return writer.ToString();
}

This would require your serialization WriteObject call can accept a TextWriter instead of a Stream.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes sorry I have added the declaration of ser now. It only accepts an XmlWriter, which doesn't really help me as I can't then just add '{'s and whatever. I guess it uses XmlSerializer underneath but I don't want to have to think about that right now. Setting the position has no effect. – Gaz Aug 5 '09 at 10:56

To access the content of a MemoryStream after it has been closed use the ToArray() method. The following code demonstrates how to get the content of the memory buffer as a UTF8 encoded string.

byte[] buff = stream.ToArray(); 
return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buff,0,buff.Length);

Note: ToArray() is better than GetBuffer() because ToArray() returns the exact length of the stream, rather than the buffer size (which might be larger than the stream content).

An alternative is to create a new MemoryStream which is a clone of the original, and then access it via a StreamReader e.g.

using (MemoryStream readStream = new MemoryStream(stream.ToArray()))
{
...
}

ToArray() makes a copy of the original bytes, so the ideal solution is to access the original MemoryStream before it has been closed, if possible.

share|improve this answer

Just a wild guess: maybe you need to flush the streamwriter? Possibly the system sees that there are writes "pending". By flushing you know for sure that the stream contains all written characters and is readable.

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