Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Curious bit of code here...

var x = 5;

function fn() {
    x = 10;
    return;
    function x() {}
}
fn();
alert(x);

Here's the jsFiddle

Is function x() {} called at all after return ? Why not alert 10?

share|improve this question
1  
Bizarre... If you comment out the function x()... line, it alerts 10. –  Shmiddty Sep 7 '12 at 19:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

function x() {} is hoisted to the start of fn's scope, and this effectively makes x a local variable before x = 10; is evaluated.

The function is not set to 10.

Update: The sentence above is wrong. x is actually set to 10. var is not used to declare it, but even if it was, the last sentence in the quote below only refers to the declaration part of the name x, not its assignment to 10.

From MDN (emphasis mine):

function

Three forms with different scope behavior:

  • declared: as a statement at the parent function top-level
    • behaves like a var binding that gets initialized to that function
    • initialization "hoists" to the very top of the parent function, above vars

var

  • function-scoped
  • hoist to the top of its function
  • redeclarations of the same name in the same scope are no-ops
share|improve this answer
1  
Clear and informative, thanks! –  Spencer Avinger Sep 7 '12 at 20:04
1  
Do you mean "precede" instead of "supersede"? The x = 10 is still evaluated and the function overwritten by 10. –  gray state is coming Sep 7 '12 at 21:01
1  
@user, whoops, you're absolutely right, I took into account a var keyword that was not there. Thanks for the heads-up, I'll fix this right away. –  Frédéric Hamidi Sep 7 '12 at 21:06

function x float to the top, so you assigning the function to 10

share|improve this answer

You are declaring function x within fn; therefore, you are using the locally scoped version of x. It doesn't matter at what point the function x is declared. What you are actually doing when you set x to 10 is you are setting the function of x to 10.

share|improve this answer

This code also alerts 5:

var x = 5;

function fn() {
    x = 10;
    return;
    var x;
}
fn();
alert(x);​

The important point is that you are declaring a local variable x. Declaring a variable after the return statement also doesn't matter - it is still a local variable.

Remove the declaration and you get 10 instead because the x is no longer a local variable.

share|improve this answer

This is caused by the way variable hoisting works in JavaScript. Variable declarations are hoisted but not their assignemnts. Function declarations are also hoisted together with the function body (although function expressions are not).

So your code is effectively doing this:

 var x = 5;

 function fn() {
     var x;
     x = function () {}
     x = 10;
     return;
 }
 fn();
 alert(x);

The x within the function is hence declared with only local scope and does not affect the x decalred in the main code.

share|improve this answer

This is because fn is an object, and x is a property of that object. Local-scope always takes precisence over globals.

share|improve this answer
    
This is totally wrong. The x is not a property of the function object. –  gray state is coming Sep 7 '12 at 21:04
    
Sure it is, check this fiddle: jsfiddle.net/f7tRR/5 –  Matthew Sep 7 '12 at 21:06
    
In JavaScript there's a clear distinction between variables and properties. The x defined by the function declaration creates a variable that has no direct relationship with the fn object. A variable scope is created by invoking the function object, but the variables never become properties of the object. –  gray state is coming Sep 7 '12 at 21:11

X in fn() is a function but x in the global scope is a var

remove the function x() {} part and x will be alerted 10

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.