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I'm a beginner in C++ and using the book "C++ Primer Plus" to teach myself the language as well as to become more comfortable in programming.

I was doing some excersises in the book which are related to the topic of function templates and I have two questions.

I don't understand why the following explicit specialization doesn't work:

template <typename T>
T lesser(T a, T b)
{
        return a > b ? a : b;
}


template <> 
box lesser<box>(box& a, box& b)
{
        return a.volume > b.volume? a : b;
}

Assuming I have a structure of type box, why is it not possible to specialize the type to type "box&" but to type "box"? The second declaration means "Don't use lesser() template to generate a function definition. Instead, use a seperate, specialized function". And still, I can't use type box&, only type box. Why is that?

edit: Ok, the second problem just disappeard by itself.

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2  
Problems that go away by themselves come back by themselves. –  Pete Becker Sep 7 '12 at 21:15
    
The part you edited out, btw, compiled and ran fine for me. –  jrok Sep 7 '12 at 21:16
    
Yeah, after I restared Visual Studio, It also compiled fine for me. –  milchschaum Sep 7 '12 at 21:26
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to specialize T to the same type in every instance:

template <>
box& lesser<box&>(box& a, box& b)
{
    // ...
}

Or you could use box in every case.


Alternatively, you could change your template to something like:

template <typename T>
T lesser(const T& a, const T& b)
{
        return a > b ? a : b;
}

and specialize it as

template <>
box lesser(const box& a, const box& b)
{
        // ...
}
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Ahhh of course, I completely missed the return type..what a stupid mistake! Thank you guys for your help! :) –  milchschaum Sep 7 '12 at 21:20
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The template has only one parameter - T. The return type and the type of the arguments need to be same. But you specialization takes parameters by reference and returns by value - that's two different types and so the template and specialization don't match.

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Your specialization doesn't match the template. The template expects a function taking two objects by value and returns an object of the same type. Your specialization is a function taking two box object references and returns a box object.

Oh, and prior to it being removed, your second example demonstrates this, as there all things match up nicely. Go back to that and compare against this.

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