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I have a class called ElementInfo

public class ElementInfo {

    public String name;
    public String symbol;
    public double mass;

}

Then I attempt to create an array of ElementInfo like so:

ElementInfo e[] = new ElementInfo[2];

e[0].symbol = "H";
e[0].name = "Hydrogen";
e[0].mass = 1.008;

//...

Dont tell me i have to call new for every instance of the class!

Can I do this:

ElementInfo e[] = new ElementInfo[100];
for(ElementInfo element: e){
    e = new ElementInfo();
}
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Then, how would you like to do that? Do you have any other thoughts in mind? –  Nambari Sep 7 '12 at 21:37
1  
Be careful on what you call a class and an object. You've created an array of objects, which are of a specific class. –  E_net4 Sep 7 '12 at 21:38
    
i meant to say an array of class objects –  nick Sep 7 '12 at 21:38
    
i updated my question. can i create a bunch of objects like i shown? –  nick Sep 7 '12 at 21:41
    
So, what week of Java 101 are you in? I'm gonna guess week 2. Maybe I'm way off base, but if I'm not, please add the 'homework' tag. And best of luck with your class :) –  Cody S Sep 7 '12 at 22:33

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to call new for every element of the class.

public class ElementInfo {

    private String name;
    private String symbol;
    private double mass;

    public String get_name() { return name; }
    public String get_symbol() { return symbol; }
    public double get_mass() { return mass; }

    public ElementInfo(name, symbol, mass) {
        this.name = name;
        this.symbol = symbol;
        this.mass = mass;
    }
}

Then create them like so:

e[0] = new ElementInfo("H", "Hydrogen", 1.008);
share|improve this answer
    
a constructor forces me to input name, symbol, and mass for every element. i want the class to act like a structure –  nick Sep 7 '12 at 21:47
    
that also means that you leave the object in an inconsistent state as you assign to it. For future best practice and as your systems grow complex objects like this should be immutable after construction which eliminates any concern about inconsistency or contention. –  Matt Whipple Sep 7 '12 at 21:51
    
yeah i think ill use this approach thanks –  nick Sep 7 '12 at 21:57

Dont tell me i have to call NEW for every instance of the class!

Exactly.

You just created an array of nulls.

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You have to create a new instance for each element, but it's not hard :

ElementInfo e[] = new ElementInfo[2];
for (int i = 0; i < e.length; i++)
    e[i] = new ElementInfo();
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ElementInfo e[] = new ElementInfo[2];

e[0] = new ElementInfo();
e[0].symbol = 'H'; ...
share|improve this answer

Yes, you have to do.

When you create the array you just create the space for the references to the actual objects. Initially the value is null.

To put references to an object, you do an assignation

e[0] = new ElementInfo();

or

ElementInfo a = new ElementInfo();
....
e[0] = a;

Relax, typing will be the last of your problems as a programmer :-D

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well good thing i can copy/paste and use regular expressions :) –  nick Sep 7 '12 at 21:49

By declaring an array, instances of that array's type do not automatically fill the array.

e[0] = new ElementInfo();

You can also instantiate an object at every index easily with a for loop.

for (int i = 0; i < e.length; i++) {
    e[i] = new ElementInfo();
}
share|improve this answer

Yes. Right now its an array that holds ElementInfo objects but each index is null.

Why don't you create a constructor that takes the arguments. Then

ElementInfo [] elements = {new ElementInfo("H", "Hydrogen", 1.008), new ElementInfo("C", ....)};
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Because perhaps some elements will have more parameters and i rather keep it in this format –  nick Sep 7 '12 at 21:42
ElementInfo e[] = new ElementInfo[100]; 
for(ElementInfo element: e){ 
    e = new ElementInfo(); 
}

You cannot do that because e is an array type variable, which means you cannot assign to it a reference to an of object of type ElementInfo. e = new ElementInfo(); is what I am referring to.

Look at the answer by Dalmus.

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