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Specific question

How to create an array of buttons on Borland C++ Builder and work with it?

I'm using Borland C++ Builder 6 and Borland Developer Studio 2006 (Turbo C++ 2006).

Purpose

To work with a lot of buttons on a form just using a for loop with an index, for example, changing their caption, size and position.

I know if I have a button called Button1 and inside a click event of this button if I create another button (through TButton *Button2 = new TButton(Form1)), I can assign Button1 to Button2 (Button2 = Button1) and them I can simply modify caption of Button1 with Button2->Caption. So I would like to extend it assigning pointers of real components to elements of an array to them work with all of them with a for loop.

Well, if someone found an way to add all buttons as an array on a form, it's better :)

Tries

Following tests were made putting respective code on TForm1::Button1Click(), an event of a button on a form:

  • Test 1

    • Description: Creating an array directly
    • Code:

      TButton Buttons[3];
      
    • Result: Compile error:

      > [C++ Error] Unit1.cpp(23): E2248 Cannot find default constructor
      > to initialize array element of type 'TButton'
      
    • Comments:
      • I tested some variants of this test (e.g. TButton Buttons = new TButton[3], working with calloc function and others), but all of them points to the issue that TButton does not have a constructor without arguments, i.e., TButton(), but only TButton (TComponent *AOwner), TButton(void *ParentWindow) and TButton(const TButton &);
      • Any way to use operator new with arguments for TButton constructor prototypes, for an array?
  • Test 2

    • Description: Creating a vector
    • Code: Also add #include "vector.h" on unit header...

      vector<TButton> Buttons;
      Buttons[0].Caption="it is ok";
      Buttons[1].Caption="mayday, mayday";
      
    • Result: Debugger exception on 3rd line:

      > Project Project1.exe raised exception class EAccessViolation
      > with message 'Acceess violation at address 401075B9 in module
      > 'vcl60.bpl'. Read of address 00000254'. Proccess stopped. Use
      > Step or Run to continue.
      
    • Comments:
      • Yeah, I expected that it would be raised, but I put it here to someone say how to allocate memory for more elements on that vector after created, since vector<TButton> Buttons(3); does not work for the same reason test1 failed :(

General question

How to do it for any visual component?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All of your attempts failed for the same reason - you are trying to create an array/vector of actual TButton object instances instead of an array/vector of pointers to TButton instances.

To create a fixed-length array of button pointers:

TButton* Buttons[3];
...
Buttons[0] = Button1;
Buttons[1] = Button2;
Buttons[2] = Button3;
...
for(index = 0; index < 3; ++index)
{
    TButton *Btn = Buttons[index];
    // use Btn as needed...
}

To create a dynamic-length array of button pointers:

TButton** Buttons;
...
Buttons = new TButton*[3];
Buttons[0] = Button1;
Buttons[1] = Button2;
Buttons[2] = Button3;
...
for(index = 0; index < 3; ++index)
{
    TButton *Btn = Buttons[index];
    // use Btn as needed...
}
...
delete[] Buttons;

To create a vector of button pointers:

std::vector<TButton*> Buttons;
...
Buttons.push_back(Button1);
Buttons.push_back(Button2);
Buttons.push_back(Button3);
...
for(index = 0; index < 3; ++index)
{
    TButton *Btn = Buttons[index];
    // use Btn as needed...
}
/*
Or:
for(std::vector<TButton*>::iterator iter = Buttons.begin(); iter != Buttons.end(); ++iter)
{
    TButton *Btn = *iter;
    // use Btn as needed...
}
*/
share|improve this answer

Miraculous Typedef + Pseudo Array = Solution

  • Miraculous Typedef:

    • After hours searching a way, I saw a typedef on that Stack Overflow and Google search journey and thought why not to:

      typedef TButton* TButtons;
      
    • Well, it changes all the things, because I could perform:

      TButtons Buttons[3];
      
  • Pseudo Array:

    • The issue remained on how to allocate memory for data stored on that Buttons[3] array, but with knowledge of 2nd paragraph of Purpose section of my question, I thought: forget new data, data is there, point to there (so I call that to build a pseudo array, because I create only an array of pointers to existing data):

      TButtons Buttons[3] = {Button1, Button2, Button3};
      
    • Where Button1, Button2 and Button3 were already created when I put them on the form normally (through my mouse).

Working example

  1. Create a new vcl/forms application project;
  2. Put 3 buttons as those on the left on figure bellow (Button1, Button2, Button3) to demonstrate that solution, and 1 great button (Button4) also as figure bellow to do the actions; the figure bellow point 2
  3. Insert following code on click event of the fourth button, the great one (Button4);

    typedef TButton* TButtons;
    TButtons Buttons[3] = {Button1, Button2, Button3};
    int index;
    
    for(index=0;index<3;index++)
    {
            Buttons[index]->Caption=(AnsiString)"teste "+index+" - "+(1+random(100));
            Buttons[index]->Left=25+4*random(100);
            Buttons[index]->Top=25+4*random(100);
    }
    
  4. Perform a "shazam!" run and play with that... like a game project
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1  
You don't need the TButtons typedef, whose name is misleading anyway since you are creating an array of individual button pointers, not an array of button lists: TButton* Buttons[3];. As for the vector AV, that is because you did not put anything in the vector before accessing its elements. You have to push_back() the pointers into the vector before you can then use the [] operator to access them. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 7 '12 at 23:43
    
@RemyLebeau, I thought I tried TButton* Buttons[3]; before, but I saw that I didn't... So assign addresses to that array elements complete it and brings a clear solution. Thanks again :) –  kokbira Sep 10 '12 at 12:19
    
Hey, @RemyLebeau, answer my question with your clean quite obvious :) solution and then I assign you the correct answer (to you earn some SO points). –  kokbira Sep 10 '12 at 12:28
    
About your suggestion to use push_back(), I tried too, but the same error message about TButton may be created with new operator appeared... I had no success to create new entities, only to use addresses from existing ones... I think if I create a new class based on TButton with a constructor without arguments would solve that, but I haven't tried it yet... –  kokbira Sep 10 '12 at 12:33
1  
There is no need to create a new class. Simply pass NULL to the existing TButton constructor if you do not want the new button object to have an Owner assigned (an Owner will free the new object for you when the Owner itself is freed). –  Remy Lebeau Sep 10 '12 at 20:33

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