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I'm new to c++ programming and i'm getting a weird value coming back from a char* variable that i've set, depending on how i use it. I'm obviously doing something really stupid but I can't see the problem. The next couple of paragraphs describe the setup(badly), but it's probably easier to just look at the output and code.

Basically, I have a couple of classes - Menu and MenuItem. The MenuItem class has a name which is of type char*. Depending on how i'm using the menu items, i'm getting strange results when i do a getName() on the MenuItems.

I have a Machine class which has a state (TestState). This TestState creates a Menu containing MenuItems. When i create a TestState in my main function and have it print out the menu I get what I expect. When i create a Machine which contains a TestState and ask it to print the menu it prints something weird for the name of the root item in the menu.

Output - Last line I'm expecting menuItem1, but i get Hâ∆Hã=ò

Output direct from TestState Object

Displaying menu state 
menuItem1
root not null 
menuItem1


Output from TestState within Machine

Displaying menu state 
menuItem1
root not null 
Hâ∆Hã=ò

Here's my code - Main.cpp

#include "Menu.h"
#include "Machine.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

Machine m;
TestState t;

int main(void) {
    cout << "Output direct from TestState Object" << endl << endl;
    t = TestState();
    t.print();


    cout << endl << endl << "Output from TestState within Machine" << endl << endl;
    m = Machine();
    m.printCurrentState();
}

Menu.h

#ifndef Menu_h
#define Menu_h

#include <stdlib.h>

class MenuItem {
public:
    MenuItem();
    MenuItem(const char* itemName);
    const char* getName() const ;

protected:
    MenuItem *next;
    const char* name;
};

class Menu {
public:
    Menu(MenuItem *rootItem);
    Menu();
    void setRoot(MenuItem *r);
    MenuItem* getRoot() ;
protected:
    MenuItem *root;
};

#endif

Machine.h

#ifndef MACHINE_H_
#define MACHINE_H_

#include "Menu.h"

class TestState;
class Machine;

class TestState {
public:
    TestState();
    virtual ~TestState();
    void print();
protected:
    Machine* machine;
    MenuItem menuItem1;
    Menu menuMain;
};

class Machine {
public:
    Machine();
    void printCurrentState();
protected:
    TestState testState;
};

#endif /* MACHINE_H_ */

Machine.cpp

#include "Machine.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

TestState::TestState() {
    menuItem1 = MenuItem("menuItem1");
    menuMain = Menu(&menuItem1);
}

void TestState::print(){
    cout << "Displaying menu state " << endl;
    cout << menuItem1.getName() << endl;

    if (menuMain.getRoot() == NULL) {
        cout << "root is null" << endl;
    } else {
        cout << "root not null " << endl;
        cout << menuMain.getRoot()->getName() << endl;
    }
}

TestState::~TestState() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

Machine::Machine() {
    testState = TestState();
}

void Machine::printCurrentState() {
    testState.print();
}

Any help would be appreciated. I'm a bit lost. Thanks Dave

share|improve this question
5  
That can't possibly be the minimum amount of code required to solve the problem. Also, why are you including both <iostream> and <stdio.h>? –  Wug Sep 7 '12 at 22:13
1  
You really should narrow down the problem yourself before posting here. This is a lot of code to go through. –  pmr Sep 7 '12 at 22:13
    
nullptr not NULL –  oldrinb Sep 7 '12 at 22:14
1  
@oldrinb: Not everyone is using a C++11 compiler. NULL works just fine. nullptr simply eliminates some potential errors in edge cases. –  Ed S. Sep 7 '12 at 22:29
    
Wug - fair comment on the includes - don't need the stdio.h. As regards the amount of code - i've stripped down the original Machine class to reduce the amount of code i was and TestState is just one of a number of possible states the Machine can be in. The classes don't do anything useful in this stripped down state, but they run, and demonstrate the problem i had - unless i forgot something :) –  Gabby Moore Sep 7 '12 at 22:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I suspect what's happening is Menu.root is pointing to a temporary object somewhere. You'll notice that you make a copy of your machine in your main function:

// in main():
m = Machine(); // makes a machine, then copies it

That machine has a TestState, which has a MainMenu, which has a pointer to a MenuItem:

// in MenuItem class definition:
MenuItem *root;

That pointer gets initialized to the address of a member of your original Machine. Problem is, that object only exists for a short time: it's destroyed when the copy is complete, leaving you with a dangling pointer.

In other words, you need to make sure that when you copy an object that contains pointers, you update those pointers to reflect the address of the duplicated object instead of the old one.

You need to add copy constructors like the following:

Machine::Machine(const Machine& other)
{
    teststate = other.teststate;
    teststate.machine = this; // you will need to expose TestState.machine to Machine
}

TestState::TestState(const TestState& other)
{
    machine = other.machine; // Machine copy constructor modifies this for us

    menuItem1 = other.menuItem1; // these 3 we have to do
    menuItem2 = other.menuItem2;
    menuMain = other.menuMain;

    menuMain.setRoot(&menuItem1); // update pointers to be to persistent copies
    menuItem1.setNext(&menuItem2);
    menuItem2.setNext(NULL);
}

You might notice that your system is rather brittle. I'd recommend relying on pointers between objects less, because dragons be down that road.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I applaud your effort going through all that code. I wouldn't. –  Alex Brown Sep 7 '12 at 22:47
    
Wug, thanks very much for your answer - it has solved my problem, and i really appreciate it. It seems like C++ is a little bit more complicated than I realised - I wasn't even aware of copy constructors :) –  Gabby Moore Sep 7 '12 at 23:14
TestState::TestState() {
    menuItem1 = MenuItem("menuItem1");
    menuItem2 = MenuItem("menuItem2");
    menuMain = Menu(&menuItem1);
    menuMain.add(&menuItem2);
}

Machine::Machine() {
    testState = TestState();
}

The Machine constructor constructs a temporary TestState and copies its data members into Machine::testState. When the Machine constructor is done, the temporary TestState disappears, but Machine::testState.menuMain.root still points to a member of the temporary.

How to fix:

Learn what is meant by each of the various ways that exist to initialize variables, and how to use initialization lists in your constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
Oktalist, thanks for the info. Fair comment on "How to fix" - I'm normally a Javamonkey and I'm only using c++ for a small one-off project. I was hoping to wing it and avoid doing too much serious reading, but I guess that's beginning to seem like a bad idea. Time to hit the books :-) –  Gabby Moore Sep 7 '12 at 23:04
    
@GabbyMoore with C++ theres no such thing. You're best bet is to learn how pointers work and how bits/bytes/layout works. You can succeed with zero pointers (and use reference everywhere) but in that case you really need to use no pointers and use STL (string/deque will probably get you through most problems). –  acidzombie24 Sep 7 '12 at 23:06
    
Regarding using the STL - i'm trying to avoid that as I'm programming a chip with very little memory and i was worried it would bloat my code. –  Gabby Moore Sep 7 '12 at 23:26

Instead of writing Thing name = Thing(ctorParams); make name a pointer and use new Thing(ctorParams);. It looks like you thought you were using pointers but it worked without the new keyword so you went ahead and not used them which caused you bugs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks acid, although I don't quite get what you're saying - I still think I'm using pointers :-). But, I'll do some study tomorrow and see if I can work it out. Appreciate the help. –  Gabby Moore Sep 7 '12 at 23:23
    
In class TestState Menu menuMain is NOT a pointer and you write menuMain = Menu(&menuItem1); which is... not doing what you think it is. –  acidzombie24 Sep 7 '12 at 23:29

Machine doesn't have a copy constructor, so the various pointers and references within Machine (specifically, within TestState) are pointing to garbage.

share|improve this answer
2  
if a copy constructor is not explicitly specified, a memberwise copy is performed. –  Wug Sep 7 '12 at 22:19
    
@Wug so? Look at the constructor of TestState. –  ecatmur Sep 7 '12 at 22:23
    
@ecatmur: So... the lack of an explicit copy constructor does not mean that any pointers in the new instance "point to garbage", i.e., are unintialized. They point to whatever the copied pointers pointed to. –  Ed S. Sep 7 '12 at 22:27
    
Just having the copy constructor does not fix this problem. Default copy constructors are not enough in this specific instance, extra behavior is necessary to prevent pointers to the original object from persisting after the copy. Your answer does a poor job of describing the necessary behavior, so -1. For the record, the problem is just a disguised pointer to temporary variable. –  Wug Sep 7 '12 at 22:42
    
Thanks for the input ecatamur –  Gabby Moore Sep 7 '12 at 23:29

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