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I'm porting an algorithm that works in Matlab to numpy and observed a strange behavior. The relevant segment of code is

P = eye(4)*1e20;
A = [1 -0.015 -0.025 -0.035; 0.015 1 0.035 -0.025; 0.025 -0.035 1 0.015; 0.035 0.025 -0.015 1];
V1 = A*(P*A')
V2 = (A*P)*A'

This code, when I run with Matlab, provides the following matrices:

V1 = 1.0021e+20            0  -8.0000e+00            0
              0   1.0021e+20            0            0
    -8.0000e+00            0   1.0021e+20            0
              0            0            0   1.0021e+20


V2 = 1.0021e+20            0  -8.0000e+00            0
              0   1.0021e+20            0            0
    -8.0000e+00            0   1.0021e+20            0
              0            0            0   1.0021e+20

Note that V1 and V2 are the same, as expected.

When the same code runs in Octave, it provides:

V1 = 1.0021e+20   4.6172e+01  -1.3800e+02   1.8250e+02
    -4.6172e+01   1.0021e+20  -1.8258e+02  -1.3800e+02
     1.3801e+02   1.8239e+02   1.0021e+20  -4.6125e+01
    -1.8250e+02   1.3800e+02   4.6125e+01   1.0021e+20

V2 = 1.0021e+20  -4.6172e+01   1.3801e+02  -1.8250e+02
     4.6172e+01   1.0021e+20   1.8239e+02   1.3800e+02
    -1.3800e+02  -1.8258e+02   1.0021e+20   4.6125e+01
     1.8250e+02  -1.3800e+02  -4.6125e+01   1.0021e+20

In numpy, the segment becomes

from numpy import array, dot, eye
A = numpy.array([[1, -0.015, -0.025, -0.035],[0.015, 1, 0.035, -0.025],[0.025, -0.035, 1, 0.015],[0.035, 0.025, -0.015, 1]])
P = numpy.eye(4)*1e20
print numpy.dot(A,numpy.dot(P,A.transpose()))
print numpy.dot(numpy.dot(A,P),A.transpose())

which outputs

[[  1.00207500e+20   4.61718750e+01  -1.37996094e+02   1.82500000e+02]
 [ -4.61718750e+01   1.00207500e+20  -1.82582031e+02  -1.38000000e+02]
 [  1.38011719e+02   1.82386719e+02   1.00207500e+20  -4.61250000e+01]
 [ -1.82500000e+02   1.38000000e+02   4.61250000e+01   1.00207500e+20]]
[[  1.00207500e+20  -4.61718750e+01   1.38011719e+02  -1.82500000e+02]
 [  4.61718750e+01   1.00207500e+20   1.82386719e+02   1.38000000e+02]
 [ -1.37996094e+02  -1.82582031e+02   1.00207500e+20   4.61250000e+01]
 [  1.82500000e+02  -1.38000000e+02  -4.61250000e+01   1.00207500e+20]]

So, both Octave and numpy provides the same answer, but it's very different from Matlab's. The first point is that V1 != V2, which doesn't seem right. The other point is that, although the non-diagonal elements are many orders of magnitude smaller than the diagonal ones, this seems to be causing some problem in my algorithm.

Does anyone knows way numpy and Octave behave this way?

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2 Answers 2

They use doubles internally, which have only about 15 digits precision. Your math operations likely exceed this, which causes the mathematically wrong results.

Worth a read: http://floating-point-gui.de/

Edit: From the docs I gather that there is no higher precision available for Numpy. It seems that SymPy though may give you the needed precision - if that library works for you as well.

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Thats not quite right. There is a float128 datatype, however its precision may not always be well defined I think. –  seberg Sep 8 '12 at 0:18
    
@Sebastian, I found no reference whatsoever to a float128 type - only complex128 (because those are two float64 seen as one number with the real and imaginary part). docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/user/basics.types.html –  Lucero Sep 8 '12 at 16:13
    
Yes... thats because float128 is only available depending on the computer its running on. But on the usual PC it is. –  seberg Sep 8 '12 at 17:40

For whatever it's worth, I get identical results to matlab on a 64-bit system:

[[  1.00207500e+20   0.00000000e+00  -8.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00]
 [  0.00000000e+00   1.00207500e+20   0.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00]
 [ -8.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00   1.00207500e+20   0.00000000e+00]
 [  0.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00   1.00207500e+20]]
[[  1.00207500e+20   0.00000000e+00  -8.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00]
 [  0.00000000e+00   1.00207500e+20   0.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00]
 [ -8.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00   1.00207500e+20   0.00000000e+00]
 [  0.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00   1.00207500e+20]]
[[  1.00207500e+20   0.00000000e+00  -8.00000000e+00   0.00000000e+00]

If you're using a 32-bit system (or you have a 32-bit version of python and numpy installed on a 64-bit system) you'll run into precision problems, and get a different answer, as noted by @Lucero below. You might try explicitly specifying 64-bit floats in that case (the operations will be slower, though). For example, try using np.array(..., dtype=np.float64).

If you think you need additional precison, you can use np.longdouble (Same as np.float128 on a 64-bit system and np.float96 on 32-bit), but this may not be supported on all platforms and many linear algebra functions will truncate things back to the native precision.

Also, what BLAS library are you using? The numpy and octave results are likely the same because they're using the same BLAS library.

Finally, you can simplify your numpy code down to:

import numpy as np
A = np.array([[1,     -0.015, -0.025, -0.035],
              [0.015, 1,      0.035,  -0.025],
              [0.025, -0.035, 1,      0.015],
              [0.035, 0.025,  -0.015, 1]])
P = np.eye(4)*1e20
print A.dot(P.dot(A.T))
print A.dot(P).dot(A.T)
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1  
I don't really see the 32 vs 64bit point (matlab+numpy all use double precision as default). The Blas library however is the point probably, when with ATLAS I got the same result as @user1655812 without I got the exact one. To throw in something else np.einsum could do the same result while avoiding ATLAS here maybe. –  seberg Sep 8 '12 at 0:24
    
The difference between 32-bit and 64-bit is enough to show up in this case. I get a significantly different answer, at any rate, but it's not enough to entirely explain the OP's results. I agree, it's probably due to the BLAS library, but I didn't think to test it. (Glad you did!) My results aren't using ATLAS. (And good point about einsum!) –  Joe Kington Sep 8 '12 at 0:29
1  
Sorry yes, but its always 64bit floating points, the system does not matter. –  seberg Sep 8 '12 at 0:30
    
I was under the impression that numpy defaulted to 32-bit precision arrays on 32-bit systems, though? (I could be entirely wrong, there, but that's what I was going off of.) Edit: Scratch that, I was misremembering. –  Joe Kington Sep 8 '12 at 0:33

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