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The following snippets demonstrate a question that I have been encountering alot lately.

Basically I want to know if there is a better solution to hiding the backing value of a property than the use of inheritance as shown.

As a side question, is the feature implied by my non-compiling solution something that might be good for a future version of C#?

// This is a service that supplies a value but doesn't want to be called 
// until needed.
static class Service
{
    public static int GetP()
    {
        Console.WriteLine ("doing work...");
        return 1;
    }
}

// This is a class that implements a property which calls the service
// the first time that property is accessed but nothing stops the
// same code from accidentally referencing the uninitialized backing value.
class C
{
    void F()
    {
        // Easy to accidentally reference backing value of property
        Console.WriteLine (this.p);
    }

    int p = 0;
    int P
    {
        get
        {
            if(p == 0)
                p = Service.GetP();
            return p;
        }
    }
}

Solution using inheritance and protected property with private backing value.

// This class hides the backing value and exposed the property the derived class.
class CBase
{
    int p = 0;
    protected int P
    {
        get
        {
            if(p == 0)
                p = Service.GetP();
            return p;
        }
    }
}

class C1 : CBase
{
    void F()
    {
        // Now I can't see the backing value but I've used inheritance for the sole purpose of hiding it
        Console.WriteLine (this.P);
    }
}

What about if a const could be in the body of an instance level method/property that delayed setting until first runtime usage?

class D
{
    int P
    {
        get
        {
            const int a = Service.GetP(); // Doesn't compile
            return a;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Just my two cents, but if class C owns non-abstract property P, the backing field is a concern of class C. You shouldn't need to hide it. In the future you may have the need to access it directly. If the real concern is accidentally referencing the backing field vs public property from within the class, you could adopt a naming convention. _p and m_p are both common, though personally I prefer this.p –  Kenneth Ito Sep 7 '12 at 23:02
    
I understand what your getting at. The backing property is in the concern of the class that exposes it. I guess I am wishing for properties to encapsulate their own private fields to further hide the the details of where their value comes from in certain specific scenarios like lazy loading where the only reason the private field exists is to store the eference to the lazy loaded object. –  Aaron Anodide Sep 8 '12 at 2:31

1 Answer 1

If you're using .net 4, just use the Lazy class

class C
{
    private Lazy<int> p = new Lazy<int>(() => Service.GetP());

    private int P
    {
        get
        {
            return p.Value;
        }
    }
}

The first time you access Lazy.Value, the function supplied to the constructor will be called to initialize the value.

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