Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a test powershell V2 script that looks like this:

    function test_args()
    {
      Write-Host "here's arg 0: $args[0]"
      Write-Host "here's arg 1: $args[1]"
    }


    test_args

If I call this from the powershell command prompt I get this on the screen:

here's arg[0]: [0]

here's arg[1]: [1]

Not quite what I wanted. It seems I have to copy $args[0] and $args[1] to new variables in the script before I can use them? If I do that I can access things fine.

Is there a way to access the indexed $args in my code? I've tried using curly braces around them in various ways but no luck.

I'll be moving to named parameters eventually, but the script I'm working on (not this demo one) is a straight port of a batch file.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

function test_args()
{
  Write-Host "here's arg 0: $($args[0])"
  Write-Host "here's arg 1: $($args[1])"
}

test_args foo bar

Note that it is $args and not $arg. Also when you use a PowerShell variable in a string, PowerShell only substitutes the variable's value. You can't directly use an expression like $args[0]. However, you can put the expression within a $() sub-expression group inside a double-quoted string to get PowerShell to evaluate the expression and then convert the result to a string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Keith-- I changed my snippet to correct my typo when translating from my editor to SO. I guess my question is, do I need to pass $arg[0] and [1] to test_args as parameters, or will the function itself have access to the $args array? –  larryq Sep 7 '12 at 22:34
1  
Functions always have access to $args. It will contain any argument that doesn't map to a defined function parameter. If there are no arguments or all the arguments map to function parameters e.g. function foo($param1, $param2){} then $args will be an empty array. –  Keith Hill Sep 7 '12 at 22:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.