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I'm writing an adjacency matrix in R like so:

neighbours <- array(0, c(100,100))
for (i in 1:100) { neighbours[i,i] = 1 }    #reflexive

But then I notice that the class(neighbours) is double matrix. That's going to take up way too much room with a larger matrix. So I want to coerce the type to integer or, even better, since this is undirected, logical.

But...

> class(neighbours[5])
[1] "numeric"
> class(neighbours[5]) <- "integer"
> class(neighbours[5])
[1] "numeric"

It is no listen to me!

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You can avoid the for loop by using diag(neighbours) <- 1. –  Jilber Sep 7 '12 at 22:53
    
This would be another question, you can post it as such. –  Jilber Sep 7 '12 at 23:25

4 Answers 4

Perhaps I'm missing something, but why not just declare it as a logical array up front?

neighbors <- array(FALSE, c(100,100))
diag(neighbors) <- TRUE

Comparing the two:

> object.size(array(0, c(100,100)))
80200 bytes
> object.size(array(FALSE, c(100,100)))
40200 bytes

EDIT: I would be interested to know why a logical array takes up 4B per entry, though...

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Presumably because a logical is a 32-bit word. –  Alex Brown Sep 7 '12 at 23:03
    
That's because internally the R stores integer and logical SEXPs using C ints. There is nothing to be gained here from using the logical data type, storage wise anyway. See the relevant section of the R Internals Manual –  Gavin Simpson Sep 7 '12 at 23:05
1  
There is a package named "bit" that stores logical vectors as .. wait for it ... bits. –  BondedDust Sep 7 '12 at 23:34

One option is to fill initially with integer 0 (0L) and then replace the diagonal with integer 1, (1L)

m <- matrix(0L, 100, 100)
diag(m) <- 1L

This is half the size of the more straightforward way of creating a diagonal matrix in R:

m2 <- diag(1L, 100, 100)

> object.size(m)
40200 bytes
> object.size(m2)
80200 bytes

Hence, allocating the integer matrix m then changing the diagonal results in the most compact dense matrix.

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Isn't that what I said? I assumed m2 would end up the same as m but clearly it isn't. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 7 '12 at 23:03
    
I could have phrased that better. Editing... –  Gavin Simpson Sep 7 '12 at 23:06

It's better to not initialize it as numeric in the first place, but if you can't do that, set the storage.mode:

R> neighbours <- array(0, c(100,100))
R> for (i in 1:100) { neighbours[i,i] = 1 }
R> str(neighbours)
 num [1:100, 1:100] 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
R> storage.mode(neighbours) <- "integer"
R> str(neighbours)
 int [1:100, 1:100] 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
R> storage.mode(neighbours) <- "logical"
R> str(neighbours)
 logi [1:100, 1:100] TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE ...
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There is a sparseMatrix superclass in package Matrix (which is now a standard package). If you wanted a sparse diagonal matrix you could create it with

library(Matrix) 
Matrix(diag(1,4) , sparse=TRUE)
#---------
4 x 4 sparse Matrix of class "dsCMatrix"

[1,] 1 . . .
[2,] . 1 . .
[3,] . . 1 .
[4,] . . . 1

A further thought. If you want to change the mode of a matrix to integer and do not care that it remains dense:

> m <- matrix(rnorm(25), 5)
> m[] <- as.integer(m)  
# you do need those square-brackets or the structure becomes a dimensionless vector.
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    0    0   -1    0    0
[2,]    1    0    0    0    0
[3,]    1    0    0    0    0
[4,]    0    0    0    0    0
[5,]    0    0    0   -1    0

Yet a further thought prompted by Gavin's comment: If you goal is to represent "adjacency", and its a really big sample space, you may want simply use the sparseMatrix class as a model and instead use a two column matrix with the numbers of the pairs in the columns.. That's not exactly how sparseMatrices holds their row, column and values, but a 2 column storage mode might work for your problem. See the worked examples in the "igraph" package. I would think your problem might be represented as an undirected graph.

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... with object.size(Matrix(diag(1, 100), sparse=TRUE)) just 2500 bytes. –  Josh O'Brien Sep 7 '12 at 23:02
    
...versus 80200 bytes for the dense one. Very nice! –  isomorphismes Sep 7 '12 at 23:33
    
This is a big memory saving but unless what you want to use the matrix for subsequently accepts these sparse matrices then the saving will be lost once you need to convert to a dense representation. Not much of CRAN or base R can use sparse matrices. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 8 '12 at 7:55
    
that said, there is no guarantee that the dense integer matrix version will remain integer once it has gone through one or more R functions. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 8 '12 at 7:56
    
But if the OP studies the representation of the sparseMatrix class he will probably get insights into the issues he is facing in comming up with a more compact representation of an undirected adjacency "matrix". –  BondedDust Sep 8 '12 at 15:08

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