Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've a long version of a program that uses this code and a short version. This is the short version and oddly, this code runs perfectly fine in short version program, but because I get an access violation in the larger version, I get the feeling something is wrong. Does anyone see anything terribly wrong (that might lead to data corruption and/or access violation errors) with the following code? Or is this alright?

char strlist[5][11] = {
    { "file01.txt" },
    { "file02.txt" },
    { "file03.txt" },
    { "file04.txt" },
    { "file05.txt" }
};

typedef struct DYNAMEM_DATA {
    char *string;
    int   strlen;
} DYNAMEM_DATA;

typedef struct DYNAMEM_STRUCT {
    struct DYNAMEM_DATA **data;
    int           num_elements;
} DYNAMEM_STRUCT;

DYNAMEM_STRUCT *create_dynamem_struct(int num_elements, char *strlist)
{
    DYNAMEM_STRUCT *ds = (DYNAMEM_STRUCT *)calloc(1, sizeof(DYNAMEM_STRUCT));
    wchar_t wstring[128];
    char len[3];
    int i;

    ds->data = (DYNAMEM_DATA **)calloc(num_elements, sizeof(DYNAMEM_DATA *));
    ds->num_elements = num_elements;

    for(i = 0; i < num_elements; i++) {
        ds->data[i] = (DYNAMEM_DATA *)calloc(1, sizeof(DYNAMEM_DATA));
        ds->data[i]->string = (char *)calloc(1, strlen(&strlist[i*11])+5);
        ds->data[i]->strlen = strlen(&strlist[i*11]);
        sprintf(ds->data[i]->string, "%s, %d", &strlist[i*11], ds->data[i]->strlen);
        mbstowcs(wstring, ds->data[i]->string, 128);
        MessageBox(NULL, wstring, TEXT("Error"), MB_OK);
    }

    return ds;
}
share|improve this question
2  
so you've got two programs, one that works, and one that doesn't, and you show us the one that works, and ask us what the problem is in the one that doesn't? Or did I misunderstand something? –  jalf Sep 7 '12 at 23:19
    
And the program that works doesn't include a main() so it is a fragment of the program that works...The code doesn't compile cleanly because MessageBox, TEXT and MB_OK are not defined or declared in this code. It might not be a bad idea to check your memory allocations. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 7 '12 at 23:22
    
The larger one is far too large to expect others to sort through it. The question is: am I doing something stupid with pointers and/or (m)(c)alloc? –  Timothy Bruning Sep 7 '12 at 23:25
    
Your code that takes char *strlist as an argument and then steps through it with things like &strlist[i*11] are very delicate. It leads me to wonder what your call looks like? Your calloc() with +5 looks a bit delicate, too; does that allow for the null too? Are lengths strictly single or double digits? If so, you're more or less OK, but since there's 128 floating around too, I'm not sure. Have you used valgrind on the working and non-working programs? If not, can you get it and use it? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 7 '12 at 23:32
    
Also, have you created a function such as void dump_dynamem(FILE *fp, const char *tag, const DYNAMEM_STRUCT *data) that dumps all the data in a DYNAMEM_STRUCT. You might need a dump_dynadata(FILE *fp, const char *tag, const DYNAMEM_DATA *data) function too. I find such functions invaluable during debugging; they allow you to validate that the structure works as you think. The tag is used so you can distinguish between different invocations of the dump function. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 7 '12 at 23:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This code runs, produces 5 'Error' messages (which is to be expected), and doesn't leak any memory. Running valgrind (3.7.0) on Mac OS X 10.7.4 (using GCC 4.7.1), it is given a clean bill of health.

The problem is not, apparently, in this version of the code.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <wchar.h>

char strlist[5][11] = {
    { "file01.txt" },
    { "file02.txt" },
    { "file03.txt" },
    { "file04.txt" },
    { "file05.txt" }
};

typedef struct DYNAMEM_DATA {
    char *string;
    int   strlen;
} DYNAMEM_DATA;

typedef struct DYNAMEM_STRUCT {
    struct DYNAMEM_DATA **data;
    int           num_elements;
} DYNAMEM_STRUCT;

enum { MB_OK = 0 };
static void destroy_dynamem_data(DYNAMEM_DATA *dd)
{
    free(dd->string);
    free(dd);
}
static void destroy_dynamem_struct(DYNAMEM_STRUCT *ds)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < ds->num_elements; i++)
        destroy_dynamem_data(ds->data[i]);
    free(ds->data);
    free(ds);
}
static void MessageBox(const void *null, const wchar_t *wcs, const char *ncs, int status)
{
    if (null == 0 || status == MB_OK)
        fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", ncs);
    else
        fwprintf(stderr, L"%s\n", wcs);
}
static const char *TEXT(const char *arg) { return arg; }

extern DYNAMEM_STRUCT *create_dynamem_struct(int num_elements, char *strlist);

DYNAMEM_STRUCT *create_dynamem_struct(int num_elements, char *strlist)
{
    DYNAMEM_STRUCT *ds = (DYNAMEM_STRUCT *)calloc(1, sizeof(DYNAMEM_STRUCT));
    wchar_t wstring[128];
    //char len[3];
    int i;

    ds->data = (DYNAMEM_DATA **)calloc(num_elements, sizeof(DYNAMEM_DATA *));
    ds->num_elements = num_elements;

    for(i = 0; i < num_elements; i++) {
        ds->data[i] = (DYNAMEM_DATA *)calloc(1, sizeof(DYNAMEM_DATA));
        ds->data[i]->string = (char *)calloc(1, strlen(&strlist[i*11])+5);
        ds->data[i]->strlen = strlen(&strlist[i*11]);
        sprintf(ds->data[i]->string, "%s, %d", &strlist[i*11], ds->data[i]->strlen);
        mbstowcs(wstring, ds->data[i]->string, 128);
        MessageBox(NULL, wstring, TEXT("Error"), MB_OK);
    }

    return ds;
}

int main(void)
{
    DYNAMEM_STRUCT *ds = create_dynamem_struct(5, strlist[0]); 
    destroy_dynamem_struct(ds);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good to know. Thank you very much. –  Timothy Bruning Sep 7 '12 at 23:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.