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I'm working through some of my own examples after watching this tutorial: http://www.infoq.com/presentations/Why-is-a-Monad-Like-a-Writing-Desk and reading http://blog.sigfpe.com/2006/08/you-could-have-invented-monads-and.html.

I have come up with the following functions:

(defn unit [v s]
  (fn [] [v s]))

(defn bind [mv f]
  (f (mv)))

(defn inc+ [mv]
  (bind
   mv
   (fn [[v s]]
     (let [r (inc v)]
       (unit r (apply str (concat s " inc+(" (str r) ")")))))))

(defn double+ [mv]
  (bind
   mv
   (fn [[v s]]
     (let [r (* 2 v)]
       (unit r (apply str (concat s " double+(" (str r) ")")))))))

(defn triple+ [mv]
  (bind
   mv
   (fn [[v s]]
     (let [r (* 3 v)]
       (unit r (apply str (concat s " triple+(" (str r) ")")))))))

;; Testing:

((-> (unit 1 "1 ->") inc+))
;; => [2 "1 -> inc+(2)"]


((-> (unit 3 "3 ->") inc+ double+ inc+))
;; => [27 "3 -> inc+(4) double+(8) inc+(9) triple+(27)"]

I wish to rewrite bind to encapsulate the patterns the methods inc+ double+ and triple+ and get the same output as before. How would this be done?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured it out in two stages:

(defn unit [v s]
  (fn [] [v s]))

(defn bind [mv f]
  (let [[iv is] (mv)
        [av as] (f iv)]
    (unit av (str is " " as))))

(defn inc+ [mv]
  (bind
   mv
   (fn [v]
     [(inc v) (str " inc+(" (inc v) ")")])))

(defn double+ [mv]
  (bind
   mv
   (fn [v]
     [(inc v) (str " double+(" (inc v) ")")])))

(defn triple+ [mv]
  (bind
   mv
   (fn [v]
     [(inc v) (str " triple+(" (inc v) ")")])))

then:

(defn unit [v s]
  (fn [] [v s]))

(defn bind [mv f]
  (let [[v s] (mv)
        r     (f v)
        xs    (->> (str (type f))
                   (re-find #"\$([^\$]*)\$?")
                   second) ]
    (unit r (str s " " (str xs "(" r ")")))))

(defn inc+ [mv]
  (bind mv inc))

(defn double+ [mv]
  (bind mv #(* 2 %)))

(defn triple+ [mv]
  (bind mv #(* 3 %)))

((-> (unit 3 "3 ->") inc+ double+ inc+ triple+))
;;=> [27 "3 -> inc_PLUS_(4) double_PLUS_(8) inc_PLUS_(9) triple_PLUS_(27)"]

So looking at other Monad tutorials, especially http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/Brian-Beckman-Dont-fear-the-Monads, I think I understand the core principles now. 'Monads' really is all about being able to reuse the functions we have on hand. unit and bind have to be designed to work together. Then, its almost quite trivial to compose together functions.

Then one more abstraction to write the do-m operator:

(defn unit [v s]
  (fn [] [v s]))

(defn bind [mv f]
  (let [[v s] (mv)
        r     (f v)
        xs    (->> (str (type f))
                   (re-find #"\$([^\$]*)\$?")
                   second) ]
    (unit r (str s " " (str xs "(" r ")")))))

(defn double [v] (* 2 v))

(defn triple [v] (* 3 v))

(defn do-m [v & fs]
  (let [fn-ms (map #(fn [mv] (bind mv %)) fs)]
    (((apply comp (reverse fn-ms)) (unit v (str v "->"))))))

(do-m 3 inc double triple)
;;=> [24 "3 -> inc(4) double(8) triple(24)"]

This is another way to write achieve the same result, notice that the change was to take out the lambda function in unit and the associated calls for bind and do-m.

(defn unit [v s] [v s])

(defn bind [mv f]
  (let [[v s] mv
        r     (f v)
        xs    (->> (str (type f))
                   (re-find #"\$([^\$]*)\$?")
                   second) ]
    (unit r (str s " " (str xs "(" r ")")))))


(defn double [v] (* 2 v))
(defn triple [v] (* 3 v))
(defn sqrt [v] (Math/sqrt v))

(defn do-m [v & fs]
  (let [fn-ms (map #(fn [mv] (bind mv %)) fs)]
    ((apply comp (reverse fn-ms)) (unit v (str v " ->")))))

(do-m 3 inc double  double triple triple sqrt)
;; => [12.0 "3 -> inc(4) double(8) double(16) triple(48) triple(144) sqrt(12.0)"]
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