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I have an div element ("main") on my page who's contents changes back and forth between two different screens (their id's are "readout" and "num"), the contents of which are stored as hidden div elements (using display:none). Each screen has a button which sets mainto the other hidden div.

Since I struggled to get javascript to put num.innerHTML into main on load, I've ended up putting virtually identical content to num (with a different form name) into main:

<p>Number of Passengers per Carriage:</p>
<form method="post" action="javascript:void(0);" name="applesForm" onSubmit="setPassengers();">

<input type="text" name="numApples" id="numPassengers" />

<br/><br/>
<input type="submit" name="Submit" value="OK!"/>
</form>

setPassengers() successfully sets main's contents to readout. readout successfully sets main's contents to num (virtually identical to the original content of main). But then it won't go back to readout.

Here are setPassengers() and setPassengersAgain(), which is the same but for a different form name:

function setPassengers()
    {
            passengers=document.applesForm.numPassengers.value;

            document.getElementById('main').innerHTML=readout.innerHTML;
        }

        function setPassengersAgain()
        {
            passengers=document.applesFormAgain.numPassengers.value;

            document.getElementById('main').innerHTML=readout.innerHTML;
        }

So my question is: 1)Why isn't num changing to readout? 2)Is there a way to load num straight away on page load so as to simplify the code?

EDIT: I can use onload, which means that num is the only bit that's broken...

EDIT 2: Here are the hidden div's:

<div id="readout" style="display:none">
<p>Throughput per hour:</p>
<p id="output">--</p>

<p>Average Dispatch Time:</p>
<p id="avDisTime">--</p>

<form method="post" action="javascript:void(0);" name="dispatchForm" onSubmit="dispatch();i++;">
<input type="submit" name="Submit" value="Press on Dispatch!"/>
</form>
<br/>

<form method="post" action="javascript:void(0);" name="resetTimesForm" onSubmit="resetTimes();">
<input type="submit" name="Submit" value="Reset Times"/>
</form>

<form method="post" action="javascript:void(0);" name="resetAllForm" onSubmit="resetAll();">
<input type="submit" name="Submit" value="Reset All"/>
</form>
</div>

<!--back to default page-->
<div id="num" style="display:none">

<p>Number of Passengers per Carriage:</p>

<form method="post" action="javascript:void(0);" name="applesFormAgain" onSubmit="setPassengersAgain();">

<input type="text" name="numApples" id="numPassengers" />

<br/><br/>
<input type="submit" name="Submit" value="OK!"/>
</form>

</div>
share|improve this question
1  
Lack of details, in particular the markup where main is defined. You need to show enough code to have a working example. Posting code works, jsfiddle is nicer. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 8 '12 at 0:01
    
Edited to include the two hidden div's –  Furby Sep 8 '12 at 0:09
    
There is still no element with the ID of main in the HTML you are giving us. –  Jeremy J Starcher Sep 8 '12 at 0:11
    
At no point are you filling a variable readout as in readout.innerHTML. You are missing a var readout = document.getElementById('readout'); somewhere. –  Michael Berkowski Sep 8 '12 at 0:17
    
The whole lot is there: pastebin.com/WnGMWx4x I've commented out the original contents of main and put num into it with onload. –  Furby Sep 8 '12 at 0:17

1 Answer 1

You didn't post your HTML code, so I don't know how it looks like, but you could use somethin like:

HTML:

<button id="changeMain">Change #main</button>
<div id="main">
    <div id="readout" class="screen show">
        Readout
    </div>
    <div id="num" class="screen">
        Num
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

#main>.screen{display:none;}
#main>.screen.show{display:block;}

JavaScript:

var els=[document.getElementById('readout'),document.getElementById('num')],current;
function addClass(el,c){
    var arr=el.className.split(' ');
    if(arr.indexOf(c)>-1){return;}
    arr.push(c);
    el.className=arr.join(' ');
}
function delClass(el,c){
    var arr=el.className.split(' ');
    var i=arr.indexOf(c);
    if(i===-1){return;}
    arr.splice(i,1);
    el.className=arr.join(' ');
}
document.getElementById('changeMain').onclick=function(){
    if(!current){
        for(var i=0,l=els.length;i<l;i++){
            if(els[i].className.indexOf('show')>-1){
                current=i;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    delClass(els[current],'show');
    current=(current+1)%els.length;
    addClass(els[current],'show');
}

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/CUgqh/

Explanation:

If you want some content insode #main, you should place inside it (hidden or shown). Then, we hide all .screen with #main>.screen{display:none;} except .screen.show: #main>.screen.show{display:block;}.

Then, JavaScript code:

First we create an array with the elements:

var els=[document.getElementById('readout'),document.getElementById('num')],current;

And a function which adds/removes a class c to the element el:

function addClass(el,c){
    var arr=el.className.split(' ');
    if(arr.indexOf(c)>-1){return;}
    arr.push(c);
    el.className=arr.join(' ');
}
function delClass(el,c){
    var arr=el.className.split(' ');
    var i=arr.indexOf(c);
    if(i===-1){return;}
    arr.splice(i,1);
    el.className=arr.join(' ');
}

And we create an event to the button:

document.getElementById('changeMain').onclick=function(){
    if(!current){
        for(var i=0,l=els.length;i<l;i++){
            if(els[i].className.indexOf('show')>-1){
                current=i;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    delClass(els[current],'show');
    current=(current+1)%els.length;
    addClass(els[current],'show');
}

The code above does:

  • If it's the first time the current els' index (current) is undefined, we search which element has the class show by default.
  • It removes the class show to the current shown element, so it disappears.
  • It adds 1 to current (or it becomes 0 if it was the last els' element
  • It add class show to the current element, so it appears.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks although a lot of that went over my beginner's head! It does indeed work but I feel I'll have to sit down and understand it before I can justify using it ;) –  Furby Sep 8 '12 at 0:42

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