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I am sorry for posting a pretty redundant question. I was wondering if it was really necessary to use else {} if the code just stops or returns a value. In theory, is it really necessary to put else{} in these scenarios?

function check() {
    if($something == "something") {
        exit;
    }
    echo "hello";
}

Or

function check() {
    if($something == "something") {
        return true;
    }
    echo "hello";
}

The reason I posted this was because I saw some "professional" code which I guess they thought it looked "good."

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closed as not constructive by Nasreddine, martin clayton, vwegert, sschaef, j0k Sep 8 '12 at 9:35

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Where is else in your code? – FirmView Sep 8 '12 at 0:03
    
No, not required as the code breaks the current if statement. It is 100% up to the coder if they want to truly show why they are doing something a certain way. Also take in to mind a change later on may require changing that if to an if-else. Better to do it from the start than make changes later on probably. – Tim Withers Sep 8 '12 at 0:04
    
@Tim Withers Good point – user1631995 Sep 8 '12 at 0:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Syntactically, it's perfectly fine.

It's also a very common pattern to use, and IMHO, makes code more readable.

For the sake of code clarity/clean coding, if you're returning a boolean you should return a boolean even if the if() doesn't match.

function check() {
    if($something == "something") {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
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thanks keith, I think it looks cleaner this way – user1631995 Sep 8 '12 at 0:04

The code you have posted is valid, for more clarity i would include else also.

function check() {
   if($something == "something") {
    return true;
   } else{
    return false;
   }
 }
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1  
+1 I, with very few exceptions, favor the matched-pair and I like languages with syntax where there is no such thing as an "optional else" construct. However, for this specific case, return $something == "something"; is what I'd use. – user166390 Sep 8 '12 at 0:24

For the second scenario, if the function is supposed to return something, you don't 'need' the else, but you should at minimum return false. Personally, I don't like putting the else, because it requires the developer to read through more conditions to determine what is returned. Instead, at the bottom, put return true/false at the bottom and put any conditions you have above it.

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I agree, it does look a lot nicer – user1631995 Sep 8 '12 at 0:04

It's not necessary.

HOWEVER, the real question is if doing so improves readability. This is debatable, and can vary from developer to developer depending on preference and coding standards.

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There's no hard rule. The question of whether the else clause is used is probably dictated by indentation. If you want the code in the two blocks to line up then you put it in. If you don't then leave it out.

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