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Can anyone please explain difference between below two approaches.

Logging in controller's OnException event:

try
{
    //code         
}
catch
{
    //rollback trasanctions
    throw;
}

Or, logging in catch block:

try
{
    //code   
}
catch
{
   //logging here
   //rollback trasactions
   throw;
}
share|improve this question
    
I always log in catch blocks, then you can look for specific types of exceptions and handle them exactly as needed. – Jeremy Holovacs Sep 8 '12 at 0:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Controller's OnException method is used when an unhandled exception occurs in the processing of the request. It is indicates what functionality should happen if an unexpected exception occurs. You should really only use this as a safeguard in the event that you messed up or the system failed in an unexpected, fatal way.

If you are executing some piece of code that you expect to throw a specific exception, wrap it in try block, and handle the specific exception accordingly. This defensive approach will help you debug issues as soon as they happen, rather than wait for them to bubble up to a point where you don't know the cause.

Think about it, if you have multiple action methods and only one OnException method per controller, then you have a much more complex issue to handle, because any of the action methods or filters could have thrown the error. However, if you catch an exception called by a specific service call then you already know exactly what caused the unexpected behavior, and it will be much easier to address accordingly.

Read this for greater understanding: Eric Lippert has an excellent article in which he breaks down the different categories of exceptions that we encounter and offers best practices for addressing them. It is available at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2008/09/10/vexing-exceptions.aspx . In case you don't know who Eric Lippert is, he is very smart and you should listen to him if you code in C#. His main points are:

  • Don’t catch fatal exceptions; nothing you can do about them anyway, and trying to generally makes it worse.

  • Fix your code so that it never triggers a boneheaded exception – an "index out of range" exception should never happen in production code.

  • Avoid vexing exceptions whenever possible by calling the “Try” versions of those vexing methods that throw in non-exceptional circumstances. If you cannot avoid calling a vexing method, catch its vexing exceptions.

  • Always handle exceptions that indicate unexpected exogenous conditions; generally it is not worthwhile or practical to anticipate every possible failure. Just try the operation and be prepared to handle the exception.

Update

Just realized I didn't explicitly address the "logging" question. It probably makes most sense to avoid handling your fatal/exogenous errors in a controller scope, because you will end up duplicating your logic, often. This behavior is better handled in a global action filter.

This codeproject article Exception Handling in ASP.NET MVC explains how to override the default HandleErrorAttribute and leverage an ErrorController so that it can be applied globally.

In addition, the following 5-part blog series gives an in depth analysis of the different options you have for error handling in MVC applications: http://perspectivespace.com/error-handling-in-aspnet-mvc-3-index-of-posts

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply @SmartCaveman. Yeah it does make sense. I understood the importance of logging in catch blocks. Based on MVC architecture, if I am logging in catch blocks and want to redirect the user to generic error page. I think I need to throw it for framework to handle the redirection. But if I throw it, "OnException" event is getting called where I have logging for other non-specific exceptions. So, one exception is logged two times ? – Sunny Sep 8 '12 at 0:41
    
A lot of my answer applies more to resolving the exceptions than to logging them. I think it's okay for you to do your logging on the global level for the reasons you have expressed. – smartcaveman Sep 8 '12 at 0:53
    
Alternatively, you could set a flag in HttpContext.Items and log the request error in the LogRequest event of the ASP.NET application lifecycle – smartcaveman Sep 8 '12 at 0:55

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