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I had a method like this:

def _play(self):
    carda = self._carda
    cardb = self._cardb

    if carda.is_trump and cardb.is_trump:
        winner = self._winbyrank() 
        return winner

    if not carda.is_trump and not cardb.is_trump:
        if carda.suite == cardb.suite:
            winner = self._winbyrank()
            return winner
        else:
            winner = self._winbyfirst()
            return winner

    if carda.is_trump and not cardb.is_trump:
        winner = self._winbytrump()
        return winner
    elif not carda.is_trump and cardb.is_trump:
        winner = self._winbytrump()
        return winner

This was occasionally (and to me unpredictably) returning None. When I replaced it with the following it fixed the problem.

def _play(self):
    carda = self._carda
    cardb = self._cardb

    if carda.is_trump and cardb.is_trump:
        winner = self._winbyrank() 

    if not carda.is_trump and not cardb.is_trump:
        if carda.suite == cardb.suite:
            winner = self._winbyrank()
        else:
            winner = self._winbyfirst()

    if carda.is_trump and not cardb.is_trump:
        winner = self._winbytrump()
    elif not carda.is_trump and cardb.is_trump:
        winner = self._winbytrump()

    return winner

Isn't this a bug in the Python interpreter? Shouldn't the method return the winner value and exit the method rather than still moving 'till the end and returning None? I'm using Python 2.7.3

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3  
If it was returning None the first time, it should be throwing NameError: name 'winner' not defined the second time -- the same circumstances that lead to None being returned should be the same circumstances that cause the function to fall through to return winner without assigning it. –  nneonneo Sep 8 '12 at 2:17
    
I think thats the case too ... but you are right that he appears to cover all four possible truth values ... –  Joran Beasley Sep 8 '12 at 2:18
    
Exactly nneonneo the conditions haven't changed so I should still be getting the same occasional return None also in the second case. –  L. De Leo Sep 8 '12 at 2:29
    
Is is_trump a simple boolean, some other type, or a property? –  tzaman Sep 8 '12 at 2:30
    
tzaman is_trump is just a boolean –  L. De Leo Sep 8 '12 at 2:31

5 Answers 5

The answer to "is there a bug in a commonly-used part of Python, such as returning values from functions?" is almost certainly going to be "no."

Your first function has a path where it can get to the end, if none of the if conditions are met, avoiding the explicit returns. When this happens, it returns None by default. You avoid this problem in your second version by ending your function with an unconditional return statement. Which is the practice I'd recommend.

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4  
Except that he covers all four cases concerning two booleans. Unless he's got another thread mucking up the works (and assuming proper indentation), it should never return None. –  nneonneo Sep 8 '12 at 2:15
    
Yeah that's the tricky thing nneonneo I believe there aren't any more cases to cover. Also the threading issue couldn't apply as I'm working under the single-threaded Django dev server. –  L. De Leo Sep 8 '12 at 2:27
    
I'll put money on the problem being simultaneous requests from the browser, making your Django process concurrent where you don't expect it. –  Ned Batchelder Sep 8 '12 at 12:35

You've goofed your indentation, mixing tabs and spaces. Use python -tt to verify. And stick to elif the whole way through unless you have reason for more than one if statement to be true.

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Hi Ignacio, thanks for the answer but I didn't have any indentation problems. Python -tt returned nothing. Also I checked my code multiple times with pyflakes, pycharm, pylint, etc... and they didn't point out any such big problems with the code. If I had an indent problem I'd switch to Ruby! :) Wasted a ton of time tracking this bug down! –  L. De Leo Sep 8 '12 at 2:12

In addition to Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams's comments, it is also considered bad practice to have a if/elif kind of block without an else.

So if you have something like this:

if spam:
    return eggs

Make sure you also have the else:

if spam:
    return eggs
else:
    return no_eggs
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1  
Actually, I don't think it's bad practice at all. Consider the case where the if/elif serve to weed out some uncommon or special cases before proceeding with the main case. In that case, it is ugly to have most of your logic under the else clause. –  nneonneo Sep 8 '12 at 2:13
    
However, if your if, elif, and would-be else suites are approximately similar, then else is preferred for symmetry. –  nneonneo Sep 8 '12 at 2:14
    
@nneonneo: there are always exceptions of course :) I'm just talking about the general case, if you don't have a good reason not to, do it like that ;) –  Wolph Sep 8 '12 at 11:51

This is not an answer to the None return issue, but you can simplify your control flow hugely:

if carda.suite == cardb.suite: #if suites are the same, no need to check trumps
    winner = self._winbyrank()
elif carda.is_trump or cardb.is_trump: #different suites so only one can be trump
    winner = self._winbytrump()
else: #since neither of the above triggered, they are different non-trump suites
    winner = self._winbyfirst()

That in itself should take care of stray paths (not that I see any, if your indentation is good.)

I'm far more inclined to believe there was a bug in one of your conditions, than in the Python interpreter - specially such a catastrophic one! In general, trying to keep your control flow as simple and clear as possible is the best way to avoid such issues.

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Thanks, that's helpful tzaman –  L. De Leo Sep 8 '12 at 2:42

You argue that you have covered all four possible values of two booleans, and thus the function can never reach the end.

Indeed, if you had written

a = carda.is_trump
b = cardb.is_trump

and then tested against a and b, this would be true. However, Python will re-lookup the attribute each time you ask for it via the dot notation. Not only that, looking up an attribute can return the value of arbitrary Python code (due to the existence of properties). Hence there is no reason for the values to remain constant through the function.


A simple counterexample:

>>> class Card(object):
...     def __init__(self):
...             self.trump = False
...     
...     @property
...     def is_trump(self):
...             self.trump = not self.trump
...             return self.trump
... 
>>> carda = Card()
>>> carda.is_trump
True
>>> carda.is_trump
False
share|improve this answer
    
Except he already clarified that is_trump is just a bool, not a property. –  tzaman Sep 8 '12 at 2:49

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