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I am receiving a number N where N is a 4-bit integer and I need to change its LSB to 1 without changing the other 3 bits in the number using C.

Basically, all must read XXX1.

So lets say n = 2, the binary would be 0010. I would change the LSB to 1 making the number 0011.

I am struggling with finding a combination of operations that will do this. I am working with: !, ~, &, |, ^, <<, >>, +, -, =.

This has really been driving me crazy and I have been playing around with >>/<< and ~ and starting out with 0xF.

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Yes but I don't want the answer. I want guidance. –  40Alpha Sep 8 '12 at 4:20
    
@JohnLanz: This is too simple to offer guidance without spelling it out. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 8 '12 at 4:26
    
n | ~n will set all the bits to 1, not only the LSB –  phoxis Sep 8 '12 at 4:28
    
@Marcelo I didn't know.. I thought I had to use shifts plus other operators, I was making it too complicated. –  40Alpha Sep 8 '12 at 4:29
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try

number |= 1;

This should set the LSB to 1 regardless of what the number is. Why? Because the bitwise OR (|) operator does exactly what its name suggests: it logical ORs the two numbers' bits. So if you have, say, 1010b and 1b (10 and 1 in decimal), then the operator does this:

   1 0 1 0
OR 0 0 0 1
=  1 0 1 1

And that's exactly what you want.

For your information, the

number |= 1;

statement is equivalent to

number = number | 1;
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Use x = x | 0x01; to set the LSB to 1

A visualization

      ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?
   OR
      0  0  0  0  0  0  0  1
      ----------------------
      ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  1

Therefore other bits will stay the same except the LSB is set to 1.

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Use the bitwise or operator |. It looks at two numbers bit by bit, and returns the number generated by performing an OR with each bit.

int n = 2;
n = n | 1;
printf("%d\n", n); // prints the number 3

In binary, 2 = 0010, 3 = 0011, and 1 = 0001

   0010
OR 0001
-------
   0011 
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If n is not 0

n | !!n

works.

If n is 0, then !n is what you want.


UPDATE

The fancy one liner :P

n = n ? n | !!n : !n;
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By !!, you mean bitwise complement, right? Cause thats ~ in C. –  Linuxios Sep 8 '12 at 4:22
    
@Linuxios Not exactly, ! operator turns non-zero value to 0 and 0 to exactly 1. –  Summer_More_More_Tea Sep 8 '12 at 4:23
    
@Linuxios: he does mean !. For non-zero n, !!n is 1, which is the right thing to put in the |. It's just a very funny way of generating a 1, that (as stated in this answer) doesn't work in the case where n is 0. –  Steve Jessop Sep 8 '12 at 4:23
    
@SteveJessop I assume the OP tries to make the LSB 1 without introducing constant explicitly. If it is not the original mind, ignore my answer. :) –  Summer_More_More_Tea Sep 8 '12 at 4:25
    
@Summer_More_More_Tea: ah, in the case you should say "if n is 0, then !n is what you want", to avoid using the constant in that case either. I'm all for funniness as long as it's deliberate. n = n ? n | !!n : !n;. But I don't think that is what the questioner wants, I think he's just stalled on understanding bitwise ops at all. –  Steve Jessop Sep 8 '12 at 4:26
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