Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a data frame named "mydata" that looks like this this:

   A  B  C   D 
1. 5  4  4   4 
2. 5  4  4   4 
3. 5  4  4   4 
4. 5  4  4   4 
5. 5  4  4   4 
6. 5  4  4   4 
7. 5  4  4   4 

I'd like to delete row 2,4,6. For example, like this:

   A  B  C   D
1. 5  4  4  4 
3. 5  4  4  4 
5. 5  4  4  4 
7. 5  4  4  4 
share|improve this question
1  
Also, you might want to become familiar with some common terminology for working with data. This is usually referred to as subsetting, which, if you searched in Google for "r subset data frame" you would get to the very helpful UCLA R FAQ page. Welcome to Stackoverflow, by the way! – A Handcart And Mohair Sep 8 '12 at 4:55
    
Added some additional ways of subsetting using boolean vectors, in addition to @mrdwab's excellent answer. – Paul Hiemstra Sep 8 '12 at 10:57

The key idea is you form a set of the rows you want to remove, and keep the complement of that set.

In R, the complement of a set is given by the '-' operator.

So, assuming the data.frame is called myData:

myData[-c(2, 4, 6), ]   # notice the -

Of course, don't forget to "reassign" myData if you wanted to drop those rows entirely---otherwise, R just prints the results.

myData <- myData[-c(2, 4, 6), ]
share|improve this answer
11  
Don't forget to note the , in there! ;) – Steven Jeuris Jan 22 '15 at 20:59
    
what if your dataframe is only one column. It seems to drop the whole structure and outputs a vector of the values – road_to_quantdom Mar 19 '15 at 18:37
3  
@road_to_quantdom, add a drop = FALSE in there. – A Handcart And Mohair Mar 20 '15 at 1:26
    
@AnandaMahto Where? – Speldosa Aug 18 '15 at 22:38
1  
"In R, the complement of a set is given by the '-' operator" -> This is a very misleading wording. Negative indexes are removed and that's it, there is no notion of complement. If you work with logical and try using - it won't work, because the complement operator for logicals is !. The complement of c(2,4,6) in the rows would rather be setdiff(c(2,4,6),1:nrow(myData)), which is not c(-2, -4, -6), although both would yield the same rows when used with [. – antoine-sac Dec 4 '15 at 11:14

You can also work with a so called boolean vector, aka logical:

row_to_keep = c(TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE)
myData = myData[row_to_keep,]

Note that the ! operator acts as a NOT, i.e. !TRUE == FALSE:

myData = myData[!row_to_keep,]

This seems a bit cumbersome in comparison to @mrwab's answer (+1 btw :)), but a logical vector can be generated on the fly, e.g. where a column value exceeds a certain value:

myData = myData[myData$A > 4,]
myData = myData[!myData$A > 4,] # equal to myData[myData$A <= 4,]

You can transform a boolean vector to a vector of indices:

row_to_keep = which(myData$A > 4)

Finally, a very neat trick is that you can use this kind of subsetting not only for extraction, but also for assignment:

myData$A[myData$A > 4,] <- NA

where column A is assigned NA (not a number) where A exceeds 4.

share|improve this answer

You can use the filter function from the dplyr library.

mydata <- mydata %>% filter(c(TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE))
share|improve this answer
10  
This is a pretty terrible way to use filter, requiring listing out a vector as long as the data frame. A much better way would be to use slice(-c(2, 4, 6)) or to use filter() with row_number() as in the ?slice documentation. – Gregor Jul 31 '15 at 20:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.