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I am coding to interface.

I have an interface A and a class B that implements it.

I am told that I could override B's functionalities by extending it by C but I am asked to touch neither B nor C, and then later replace B with C as the implementation class of A in the configuration files.

I figure that I need a method that is not available in A, so I need to add a method to A that I could implement in C. But I am not allowed to touch A.

Could someone help me with how-could-it-be done?

Thanks.

EDIT: Example code:

A.java

public interface A {
    void X();
    void Y();
}

B.java

public class B implements A {
    public void X() {//something interesting}
    public void Y() {//something not very interesting}
}

Now because I was not allowed to touch either A or B I had to write another class C and extend it from B to do my things.

C.java

public class C extends B {
    public void Y() {//overriding B's not very interesting Y and making it interesting}
}

Now I need another method void Z() in C.java to do my thing but because I am coding to interface A if I add a method just on C.java while using A's reference variable I will not be able to call Z() so I will have to declare void Z() in A interface as well to use it like that but if I do that I will have to touch A which I am not allowed to. So how to get this issue resolved is what I've been trying to ask.

So essentially, I wont be able to do something like following:

A a = new C();
a.Z(); //can't do this

So is there any way for me to achieve something like that without touching A or B?

share|improve this question
1  
do you perhaps mean: touch neither A nor B –  11684 Sep 8 '12 at 6:08
    
plus: why can't you have a method that isn't in the interface? This isn't Objective-C! –  11684 Sep 8 '12 at 6:09
    
yes, I know that is possible in ObjC too, but it's more common there. –  11684 Sep 8 '12 at 6:10
    
You can't touch A, B, or C and must replace B with C's implementation of A? This is impossible unless you can either alter C or extend C to D and replace B with your new implementation of D. You cannot add a new method outside of the interface A and expect it to be used by the default consumers of A's interface. –  Jordan White Sep 8 '12 at 6:16
1  
OK, but what did you mean actually? –  Hope Sep 8 '12 at 6:20
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I understand what you want. You have the following:

public interface A {
  // can't touch this
}

public class B implements A {
  // can't touch this
}

public class C extends B {
  // you want to add your own method
  void someNewMethod();
}

// And you wish to do this:
A foo = new C();
foo.someNewMethod();

If this is what you want, then I'm afraid it cannot be done. Anyone working with A only knows about the methods defined in A; they won't know you've defined someNewMethod() in your class C. You need to be allowed to change A.

Note that in extremis, you could check the class type of instances of A:

A foo;
// ...

if (foo instanceof C) {
  ((C) foo).someNewMethod();
}

but that is really ugly and breaks many of the cardinal rules of OO programming.

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I do not know if you're allowed to do this, but you can extend interfaces as well as classes, you could do:

public interface A2 extends A { public void mySuperVeryInterestingNewMethod(); }

share|improve this answer
    
This could be done but the thing is the application am working on has so many instances of A that it can't be imagined to replace all the instances of A by A2. There wasn't any other option so I had to declare the method in interface A itself. Thanks for the reply:). –  skip Sep 10 '12 at 8:26
    
Eclipse has a 'refactor option if you ctrl+click/right-click option. That isn't so hard! @skip –  11684 Sep 10 '12 at 12:08
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So, according to what you just wrote, you can't touch A, B, nor C... so, extend C with D?

Then you can add whatever methods you need/want.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't touch just A or B. I created C for I had to override some of the methods implemented in B. The thing is that I coding to interface so am using a reference variable of type A but the implementing class of A could be B or C or D but I've got to have that new method that I want to use declared in A` for A's reference variable to use to call that method. –  skip Sep 8 '12 at 7:40
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Your question is not clear at all. Is this is what you mean or what you want?

public interface InterfaceA
{

}

public class ClassB implements InterfaceA
{

}

public class ClassC extends ClassB
{

}

public class ClassD extends ClassC
{

}

public class Main
{
    protected InterfaceA A;

    public Main()
    {
        //A = new ClassB();
        A = new ClassD();
    }


    public static void main(String[]args)
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't touch just A or B. I created C for I had to override some of the methods implemented in B. The thing is that I coding to interface so am using a reference variable of type A but the implementing class of A could be B or C or D but I've got to have that new method that I want to use declared in A` for A's reference variable to use to call that method. –  skip Sep 8 '12 at 7:42
add comment

If the method is supportive you don't need to add it to an interface to implement it. If it is used elsewhere then B implements another interface D.

share|improve this answer
    
The whole issue here is coding to interface A. At the client front I am using A's reference variable to call methods. –  skip Sep 8 '12 at 8:24
1  
I think I follow. You have a variable which is of type A. You know it is a B and you need to call a method that isn't in A's interface. You need to either reference B directly instead of referencing the generalization A or attempt try to cast to B and handle errors casting –  Stuart Wakefield Sep 8 '12 at 9:10
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