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I'm struggling with a jquery or javascript problem.

It already got annoying which tells me I might think too complicated on this one.

So my markup (simplyfied) looks like this:

<div class="container">
    My Content
<a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>


<div class="container">
    My Content
<a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>


<div class="container">
    My Content
<a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>


<div class="container">
    My Content
<a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>

Basically just some containers.

Each one contains different content and a button.


The Plan:

1) After a click on a button the window should scroll down to the next container.

2) The last button scrolls to the first container again. So I need a loop.

3) The numbers of containers may change from page to page.

EDIT: 4) The containers may not always be direct siblings to each other (see markup below)


The Problem:

I could get this to work by giving each container a unique ID as a target for the scroll effect.

The problem with that is that it gets too messy quickly.

Cant I just somehow target "the next object with the class: container", and scroll to that?


I'm not sure if js or jquery is the right approach. My knowledge in both is somewhat limited.

I would be really grateful for a push in the right direction.


EDIT: The containers may not always be direct siblings of each other.

<div class="row">
        <div class="container">
            My Content
        <a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
        </div>


        <div class="container">
            My Content
        <a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
        </div>
</div>        

        <div class="container">
            My Content
        <a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
        </div>


        <div class="container">
            My Content
        <a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
        </div>

<div class="row">
        <div class="container">
            My Content
        <a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
        </div>


        <div class="container">
            My Content
        <a href="#" class="button">scroll down</a>
        </div>
</div>  
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Simple solution:

To get the next container, try using next().

Basically, the <div> containers are siblings of each other, so calling .next() on one div container will give you the next.

$(".button").on("click", function(e) {
    $(document).scrollTop($(this).parent().next().offset().top);
    // $(this).parent().next() // this is the next div container.
    return false; // prevent anchor
});

http://jsfiddle.net/Pm3cj/1/

You just use $(this) to get the link object, .parent() to get the parent of the link, which is the <div>, then .next() to get the next sibling (note it will wrap automatically, so the sibling after the last <div> is the first <div>!),.offset()to get its position relative to the page,.top` to get it relative to the top border.

Then you just use $(document).scrollTop() to scroll to that location.


For a completely general solution, use:

$(".button").on("click", function(e) {
    container = $(this).parent();

    // if I am the last .container in my group...
    while (    document != container[0] // not reached root
            && container.find('~.container, ~:has(.container)').length == 0)
        container = container.parent(); // search siblings of parent instead

    nextdiv = container.nextAll('.container, :has(.container)').first();

    // no next .container found, go back to first container
    if (nextdiv.length==0) nextdiv = $(document).find('.container:first');

    $(document).scrollTop(nextdiv.offset().top);
    // $(this).parent().next() // this is the next div container.
    return false;
});

​The code basically uses container.find('~.container, ~:has(.container)') to find any sibling that has or is a .container. If nothing, then go up the DOM tree 1 step.

After it finds something which is or has a .container, it grabs it with nextdiv = container.nextAll('.container, :has(.container)').first();.

Lastly, if nothing is found, checked by nextdiv.length==0, just grab the first .container in the whole page.

Then scroll to whatever .container was grabbed.

http://jsfiddle.net/Pm3cj/3/


To animate the scroll, place the scrollTop property in an animate function:

// $(document).scrollTop(nextdiv.offset().top); // snaps to new scroll position
$('body').animate({scrollTop:nextdiv.offset().top},300); // animates scrolling

http://jsfiddle.net/Pm3cj/4/

share|improve this answer
    
Hi ronalchn, thank you for your answer. Interesting approach. Unfortunately Im afraid I oversimplified my markup to present it here, because the containers are not always direct siblings of each other. I've updated the question accordingly. Sorry for the trouble, I simply wasn't aware that this might cause problems. Thanks a ton for your efforts! –  Arrowcatch Sep 10 '12 at 4:08
    
Added general solution (adds 3 statements) - it is even more general than the structure you added to your solution, it will work with any page structure! –  ronalchn Sep 10 '12 at 8:22
    
Hey ronalch, Wow! Amazing, thank you for your help. I will implement it tomorrow but looks like its working neatly. Its only a little confusing if you dont have a scrolling animation. I thought about using .animate() for this but I'm not sure where to put it without messing up your script. Is that possible? Thanks a ton! Very impressive! –  Arrowcatch Sep 11 '12 at 7:31
    
just have to modify the line doing the scrolling, and put the property into an animate function, as shown above. –  ronalchn Sep 11 '12 at 10:58
    
Hi ronalchn! Worked absolutely perfect! Absolutely impressive! Thank you very much!!! Oh and I really apreciated the "//comments". Helped me a lot with my understanding. Out of curiosity: How long did it take you to learn all that? –  Arrowcatch Sep 11 '12 at 22:34

JavaScript is not required for this. You can use HTML anchors.

<div class="container" id="first">
    My Content
<a href="#second" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>


<div class="container" id="second">
    My Content
<a href="#third" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>


<div class="container" id="third">
    My Content
<a href="#fourth" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>


<div class="container" id="fourth">
    My Content
<a href="#first" class="button">scroll down</a>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I could get this to work by giving each container a unique ID as a target for the scroll effect. The problem with that is that it gets too messy quickly. –  Vohuman Sep 8 '12 at 8:20

What you want can be easily achieved through parent() and child().

If the number of containers on each page is different, then you should start ID'ing (don't know if that's a term) containers serially. Something like, class="container-1"

The click event on the last button should do something like:

var num = $('div[class^="container-"]').filter(function() {
    return((" " + this.className + " ").match(/\scontainer-\d+\s/) != null);
});
num++;
var last_container = $(this).parent('.container' + num);
last_container .scrollTo();

Am sure you can figure out what the next button should do ;)

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