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I am trying to write a script that connects to a list of IPs on port 53 - and I want the result to return only open ports. Here is the script I am running below - I have tried grepping and cutting the output but im not sure I am doing this correctly - I cant seem to pipe the script results to a text file either.

#!/bin/bash

for ip in $(seq 200 254); do
    nc -v 192.168.11.$ip 53 &
done

I apologise for its simplicity I am new - and if the solution is elsewhere

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2 Answers 2

Check for the command's exit code, it should be zero for a successful connection. Also use the -z option to drop the connection once it has been established.

#!/bin/bash

for ip in $(seq 200 254); do
    nc -z 192.168.11.$ip 53
    if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
        echo "Hit: 192.168.11.$ip"
    fi
done

If you were using nmap instead of netcat, you could have used this:

nmap 192.168.11.200-254 -p 53

PS. If you're trying to determine which hosts run DNS server, you should scan for open 53/udp, not 53/tcp (option -u in netcat)

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Also check for fpdns tool, it comes quite handy for DNS fingerprinting. linux.die.net/man/1/fpdns –  Igor Pozgaj Sep 8 '12 at 11:55
    
+1 Good stuff, thanks for posting, I can use this at work. –  shellter Sep 8 '12 at 12:49
    
if nc -z 192.168.11.$ip 53; then echo...; fi. No need to check $? explicitly. –  chepner Sep 8 '12 at 14:07

If you want all the output of a command to go to a file use &>. In your example you could use:

#!/bin/bash

for ip in $(seq 200 254); do
    nc -v 192.168.11.$ip 53 &>> myFile
done

Then you can manipulate (grep, sed, awk, etc.) myFile however you want.

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