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I'm trying to parse a simple filter condition using regular expressions

The filter should have the following syntax:

field=value
field:value
field!=value
field<>value
etc... (you get the idea)

I came up with the following (in scala)

val FilterEntry = """^(\w+)(!?)(=|:|<=|>=|<>|<|>)(.*)$""".r
val FilterEntry(v1, v2, v3, v4) = "field!<>value"
v1: String = field
v2: String = !
v3: String = <>
v4: String = value

So it's a fine start

Now I'd like the regular expression to catch (raise an error) when no value is passed

I tried with this (I made the last group non optional)

val FilterEntry = """^(\w+)(!?)(=|:|<=|>=|<>|<|>)(.+)$""".r
val FilterEntry(v1, v2, v3, v4) = "field!<>"
v1: String = field
v2: String = !
v3: String = <
v4: String = >

So the problem is that it recognizes the operator as "<" and th value as ">" instead of correctly recognizing the operator as "<>" and the value as "" (If I test it with the firest reg exp, it correctly recognizes the operator as <> and the value as "")

I guess I should tell the regular expression to match the operator greedily, but I thought it was like that by default...

-- edit

I've just found this scala console online, for you the test the regular expression http://www.simplyscala.com/

--

share|improve this question
    
The are greedy, yes, but that does not mean they may not back track. You need a possessive quantifier for that. I'm still thinking on how you could apply that bit of info on your regexp though. –  Maarten Bodewes Sep 8 '12 at 13:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The are greedy, yes, but that does not mean they may not back track. You need a possessive quantifier for that.

Try this one: ^(\w+)(!?)(=|:|<=|>=|<>|<|>){1}+(.+)$

Note that the order of the alternations in the operators start to matter... If the < alternative appears before <= and <> then the match engine will always greedily match < first and then not even attempt to match the longer <= or <> options. If you just sort your alternatives by length from longest to shortest you should never have this problem.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I've already realized about the order of the operators, thanks for the tip! –  opensas Sep 8 '12 at 14:43
    
nice try. but it didn't work, try copy pasting the followgin code in simplyscala.com val FilterEntry = """^(\w+)(!?)(=|:|<=|>=|<>|<|>){1}(.+)$""".r val FilterEntry(v1, v2, v3, v4) = "field!<>" –  opensas Sep 8 '12 at 14:51
2  
It should be{1}+, plus is the possessive quantifier... –  Maarten Bodewes Sep 8 '12 at 15:04
1  
@opensas - I tried the code and it works correctly. You should look at the link in the answer explaining what the possessive quantifier is and how it works. Like owlstead already pointed out, the code in your comment only has {1}, which is a greedy quantifier. You need to add the + on the end to get the possessive quantifier {1}+. –  DaoWen Sep 8 '12 at 16:47
    
sorry, my mistake, thanks a lot!!! –  opensas Sep 8 '12 at 20:31

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