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Say I have a function that returns a quoted list like so:

(defun create-structure (n l)
  '(structure (name . n)(label . l)))

I'd like the function to return:

(create-structure foo bar)
-> '(structure (name . foo)(label . bar))

Instead I get as excpected:

-> '(structure (name . n)(label . l))
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I think you can add a , just before the n, as in '(structure (name . ,n)(label . ,l))) –  Patrick Sep 8 '12 at 14:01
2  
@Patrick you also need to use a backquote –  Sigma Sep 8 '12 at 14:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are at least two ways to achieve this, Using the backquote syntax or an explicit call to list.

(defun create-structure-1 (n l)
  `(structure (name . ,n) (label . ,l)))

(defun create-structure-2 (n l)
  (list 'structure (cons 'name n) (cons 'label l)))

The GNU Emacs Lisp Reference provides a good read on the subject: - http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_node/elisp/Backquote.html#Backquote

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2  
You don't need to use a macro for this, a you can also use backquotes and commas in functions. And a backquote implies a single quote, so you don't need to use both. In place of your macro, you could do: (defun create-structure (n l) `(structure (name . ,n) (label . ,l))) –  Tyler Sep 11 '12 at 16:23
    
Nice! I'm new to stackoverflow, what's the preferred way: should I update my answer according to your improvement or not? –  Daniel Landau Sep 12 '12 at 19:51
    
I would update your answer, as the defmacro bit might be confusing to readers. –  Tyler Sep 12 '12 at 20:34
    
You are confusing the backquote syntax with the macro expansion. They are orthogonal — one can use backquotes outside defmacro just fine. –  user4815162342 Sep 12 '12 at 22:15

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