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I'm building a complex GUI that runs in the browser using SVG. The SVG has many objects that can be manipulated.

As long as I manipulate one or a few objects at the same time everything runs smoothly, but when I start moving big groups of objects things start to be very slow.

I move the SVG elements by changing each of their attributes. I think this is slow because the browser renders the SVG every time its DOM is changed, so to move a group of elements the SVG gets rendered as many times as there are elements to be moved. Is this correct?

I did an experiment that I think proves my point. If I group all the elements I want to move in an SVG group and then move this group by altering its transform attribute. The move is very smooth. In this case I change the SVG DOM only once and the SVG gets re-rendered only once.

The problem is that I can not use this technique since the elements are not grouped in the same way all the time. And regrouping the elements every time seem like adding to much unneeded complexity.

I was wondering if there is a way to postponed the rendering of the SVG until I moved all the object?

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Welcome to SO. Please include the code you're using and a working demo, such as at jsfiddle.net. –  Jared Farrish Sep 8 '12 at 15:55
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3 Answers

Maybe you can try simply remove it from dom tree and then add it back after it is changed, for example:

    <!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function change () {
            var mySVG = document.getElementById('mySVG'),
                circle = document.getElementById('myCircle'),
                body = document.body;
            body.removeChild(mySVG);
            circle.setAttribute('cx', '150');
            circle.setAttribute('cy', '100');
            circle.setAttribute('r', '80');
            body.appendChild(mySVG);
        }
    </script>
    <body>
        <button onclick="change();">change</button>
        <svg id="mySVG" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1">
            <circle id="myCircle" cx="100" cy="50" r="40" stroke="black" stroke-width="2" fill="red" />
        </svg>
    </body>
</html>

Regards,

Ben

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From the description of your problem it sounds like a drag and drop interface where you can select multiple elements and move them. It might not be drag and drop, but the principles work out in the same way. You have three events, start, move and end, in drag and drop it looks lik this:

start = function(e) {
  //capture the initial position
}

move = function(e) {
  //change the x and y attributes or transform attr
}

end = function(e) {
  //finish up
}

svg.addEventListener("mousedown", start)
svg.addEventListener("mousemove", move)
svg.addEventListener("mouseup", end)

Now, if you just want to change the attributes in the end of you action, you would do:

start = function(e) {
  //capture the initial position
}

end = function(e) {
  //change the x and y attributes or transform attr
  //finish up
}

svg.addEventListener("mousedown", start)
svg.addEventListener("mouseup", end)

So, in this case the event only fires up when twice, once when you press the mouse button and the second time when you release it.

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The browsers detect changes to the DOM sure, but they don't re-render the entire svg once per change, they all queue (batch up) the rendering operation (typically rendering happens some time after the script snippet doing the modifications has finished executing). I'd not be surprised if each change triggered some kind of layout/reflow operation though (basically tree traversal), to figure out what and where to draw.

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