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Our project is getting kind of large, and the other day I ran into this problem, when I tried to add a simple error message to a function:

def create_report(id):
    report = new_report(id)
    if not report:
        raise api_error('Could not find report with id %d' % (id,))
    ...

The problem? id was a string and it crashed when it tried to format it as a number. I was not the original author of the function and wrongly assumed that id would be a number. Instead it is supposed to be a string. Oops.

If this was a strongly typed language I would get an error from the compiler right away; what is the best way to go about these sorts of things? Should I be checking the type of every parameter (seems like a lot of legwork), or should I be putting everything in try: blocks? Maybe we should write a comment in every function describing it's parameters? Or was I simply supposed to have known better?

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1  
No, you use unit tests and integration tests to find problems like these. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 8 '12 at 15:56
    
Really bad example. In most popular statically-typed programming languages, the equivalent function (sprintf, String.Format, etc.) are not typed either, at least not in any way that permits the compiler to decide if some use of it is correct. –  delnan Sep 8 '12 at 16:00
    
@delnan, apologizes my experience in statically-typed languages is limited. FWIW, Xcode gives me a "Format specifies type 'int' but the argument has type 'NSString *' warning (but not error). –  speg Sep 8 '12 at 16:18
    
Checking types here wouldn't have helped either. You thought you were getting an int, so you would have asserted id was an int. That assertion would have raised an exception. But that's just what happened here anyway: it raised an exception. You would have gained nothing. –  Ned Batchelder Sep 8 '12 at 16:19
    
@speg Yeah, such analysis is possible if the format string is constant and the tools bother to. But it's not always possible, and unrelated to static typing in that it doesn't need/use a type for the function of interest, only for the parameters. It becomes impossible if the format string is dynamic, or if you already lost information about the exact types of the parameters (e.g. in a wrapper function or in generic code). –  delnan Sep 8 '12 at 16:20

6 Answers 6

I think the problem here is that you assert something about the value in the part of code which should get executed when something unexpected has happened. Maybe a better approach would be to change new_report(id) to raise an exception if something goes wrong - specifying if it's a value error or the id couldn't be found. Then your code should be:

def create_report(id):
    report = new_report(id)

...

def new_report(id):
    try:
       # find the report by id
       # if couldn't find raise api_error
    except ValueError:
       # explain that id is the wrong type
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Even better than the other answers' %s, I find using %r is best if the message is intended for developers' eyes. This will help you distinguish between subtle cases. For example, if you call this function with '12 ' for an id, a %s message won't show the trailing space. %r uses the repr() of the value, and so will include the quotes, helping you to see the precise value.

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True, and I fully agree, but it's more of a comment than an answer, isn't it? –  delnan Sep 8 '12 at 16:38

Try using %s and then using str(variable). This will make sure that everything gets converted to string (even list and tuples) and no TypeError takes place

def create_report(id):
    report = new_report(id)
    if not report:
        raise api_error('Could not find report with id %s' % (str(id),))
    ...
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There's no need to use %s with str(), %s performs the str() itself. –  Ned Batchelder Sep 8 '12 at 16:16
    
It does not work for when any of the arguments is a tuple. –  Himanshu Jindal Sep 8 '12 at 16:18
    
Sure it will: "%s" % (x,) works just fine when x is a tuple. –  Ned Batchelder Sep 8 '12 at 16:37
    
Oh, I tried "%s"%(x) and it did not work. Thanks for letting me know the difference –  Himanshu Jindal Sep 9 '12 at 17:07

A possible strategy to make such things more robust regarding parameter types would be to write:

def create_report(id):
    report = new_report(id)
    if not report:
        raise api_error('Could not find report with id %s' % (id,))
    ...

It won't always look nice, but at least it won't easily break.

But in general, it's always better to have some explicit contract for the function. The docstring is the right place for that.

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1  
%s implies the str() call. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 8 '12 at 16:02
    
right, I keep forgetting that. Thanks for pointing out. Anyway, "Explicit is better than implicit" ;) –  Sigma Sep 8 '12 at 16:05
    
Well, it explicitly means 'the string representation of', or 'interpolate as string'. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Sep 8 '12 at 16:07

If you really want to make sure a string printing function doesn't crash, you're probably best off using %s, which converts the integrated value to a string using pythons str()-function. And seeing how it's an ID you're talking about, I'll assume it's of type int - in which case this solution should work out fine (If you're using floats, I'm not too sure how many digits str() will keep).

Edit Aw boy, I'm slow...

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Up until python 3.2: str(afloat) gives you 12 significant digits (so 12345678.9012 with the decimal point at some location within those). Python 3.3 gives you full precision. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 8 '12 at 16:11

That format string should have used %s, not because id is a string but because it's the best choice generally. %d requires a numeric type, but %s will convert other types to strings if necessary. You should use %d only when you need to change the numeric formatting.

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