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We know the following code compiles fine:

void f() {}
void g(void) {}

f();
g();

But why not the following:

template<typename T>
void f() {}

template<typename T>
void g(T) {}

f<void>();  //ok
g<void>();  //error

Why the line g<void>() gives error?

error: no matching function for call to 'g()'

Why cant it be instantiated with void as type argument? Why the function template is not instantiated as:

void g(void) {}  //to be instantiated from the function template

After all, it is what I asked for.

I'm looking for an authoritative answer.

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My guess is that it's because templates are not a textual replacement system. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 8 '12 at 16:32
    
That is fine, but what are the rules when type argument is void? –  Nawaz Sep 8 '12 at 16:34
    
There was gcc bug 51989 - where GCC47 didn't liked void in templates. It was fixed in 48. –  Leonid Volnitsky Sep 9 '12 at 10:26
    
@LeonidVolnitsky: The URL in your comment points to this topic itself, not to the gcc bug. Could you please correct it so I can see the bug? –  Nawaz Sep 9 '12 at 13:12
    

2 Answers 2

The legalistic argument is that void is an incomplete type that can not be completed, so can never be used as a top-level type. Compare with void a;. This is a bit confusing because void in an argument list is not a type, but a convention for indicating no arguments.

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That I understand very well but why can't it be instantiated as void g(void){} which is valid? –  Nawaz Sep 8 '12 at 16:37
    
@Nawaz : I would need someone familiar with the C++ standard to confirm this with legalese, but g(void){} is valid only for C compatibility, that is, is compiled as is you wrote g(){}. The template template <typename T> g(T){} expects the function g to have one and only one argument of type T. g(void) is a function having zero arguments. You are mixing questionable syntactic sugar (the C convention) with actual C++ code (the fact T is the type of a parameter). –  paercebal Sep 8 '12 at 16:41
    
and to add to this correct answer, in C it is allowed (which causes sometimes compatibility problems with some libraries that do void f(Void) {} with a typedef for void). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 8 '12 at 23:29

C compatibility syntactic hack

The following:

void f() {}
void g(void) {}

f();
g();

compiles only because of a questionable C++ syntactic notation kept for C-compatibility reasons, that is, the void in g:

void g(void) {}

is here used to say "no parameters", and not, as could be expected "one parameter of type void" (which makes no sense).

In C++, we sometimes need to include C headers, so it would problematic if this notation was not supported. But it doesn't mean you have to use it in your C++ code.

C++ templates

When you declare:

template<typename T>
void g(T) {}

You are declaring a function g templated on the type T, which has one unnamed parameter of type T.

So, when T is void, you are still working on a function g, which has one unnamed parameter of type void. Which makes no sense. Which means the compiler complains.

Solution?

Seriously?

Don't use the g(void) notation at all. It's like typedef-ing structs in C++. It is useless and will only obfuscate the code.

Solution 2?

Now, if you really have the following code:

template<typename T>
void g(T) {}

And if you want to provide a g() implementation, you should provide an overload:

// Original template
template<typename T>
void g(T) { /* implementation for the generic case */ }

// Code to handle g()
void g()  { /* implementation for the specific "void" case */ }

And if you want to provide a g<void>() implementation, you should provide a templated overload handling the void case through a specialization:

// Original template
template<typename T>
void g(T)      { /* implementation for the generic case for g(T) */ }

// Code to handle g<void>()
template<typename T>
void g()       { /* implementation for the generic case for g() */ }

template<>
void g<void>() { /* implementation for the generic case for g<void>() */ }
share|improve this answer
    
I know the alternative solutions myself. I didn't ask for that :-). My question wasn't about that. Basically, I'm looking for authoritative answer, which means, quoting relevant text from the Standard, which clearly (directly or indirectly) forbids what I'm trying to do. –  Nawaz Sep 8 '12 at 17:23
    
@Nawaz : I know the alternative solutions myself. : I figured so when I looked at your profile, but at the time, there was only one short answer, without standard quoting (and this is the case even now). And I figured that some people not familiar enough with C++ would like to have access to a more complete explanation, even if it lacked the standard extracts you wanted as an answer... –  paercebal Sep 8 '12 at 18:14

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