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I've learned about string manipulation with bash, and more especially about substring replacement:

#! /bin/bash

VAR1="aaaa.bbbb.cccc"
VAR2="bbbb*"
echo ${VAR1%${VAR2}}

This bash script prints "aaaa.". I tried to include it in my makefile, but I can't make it work..

SHELL:=/bin/bash

VAR1="aaaa.bbbb.cccc"
VAR2="bbbb*"

all:
    @echo $${VAR1%$${VAR2}}

This Makefile only prints a blank line. I think I've misunderstood something, but can't figure out what. Any help would be really appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No need to put double quotes around VAR1 and VAR2. And you need to use export if you want to put VAR1 and VAR2 above all:

SHELL:=/bin/bash

export VAR1=aaaa.bbbb.cccc
export VAR2=bbbb*

all:
    @echo $${VAR1%$${VAR2}}
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+1 Much simpler fix than mine. –  chepner Sep 8 '12 at 17:44
    
Relly nice and useful trick, thank you ! –  Muja Sep 8 '12 at 18:10
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The problems is that VAR1 and VAR2 are not shell variables, but Makefile variables. To complicate matters further, each line in the Makefile recipe is executed in a separate shell process, which means the following naive attempt will fail:

all:
    VAR1="aaaa.bbbb.cccc"
    VAR2="bbbb*"
    @echo $${VAR1%$${VAR2}}

since VAR1 is defined in one shell, VAR2 in another, and the echo in a third where neither variable is defined. You could use the following:

all:
    @VAR1="aaaa.bbbb.cccc"; \
     VAR2="bbbb*"; \
     echo $${VAR1%$${VAR2}};

to have a single bash statement (all executed in one shell) split into multiple lines in the Makefile.

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This is exactly what I was looking for, and your explanations are clear. I thought about some "scoping" for variables, but couldn't find anything about that. Thank you ! –  Muja Sep 8 '12 at 17:40
    
You don't need the curly braces. The backslashes suffice to ensure the command is executed in a single instance of the shell. –  Idelic Sep 9 '12 at 20:46
    
@Idelic: yes, you're right. That simplifies this a little. –  chepner Sep 9 '12 at 22:15
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B̶a̶s̶h̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶k̶e̶ ̶d̶o̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶h̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶a̶m̶e̶ ̶s̶y̶n̶t̶a̶x̶.̶ ̶ ̶Y̶o̶u̶ ̶n̶e̶e̶d̶ ̶t̶o̶ You can use built-in make functions like (in this case) $(substr a,b,c)

See this

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I knew about those built-in functions but I tried to include native bash in Makefile. chepner gave me the thing I was looking for. Anyway, thank you very much for spending time to answer me :) –  Muja Sep 8 '12 at 17:38
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