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I have a model object that runs long operations. I'm trying to run some of these operations in threads to keep the interface responsive, download 2 things at once, etc, but I want to hide these details from the interface code as much as possible. I'm trying to use the AsyncCall library, but having issues.

type EUpdaterAction = (auFoundCurrentVersion, auFoundUpdateVersion);

type
  TUpdater = class
  public
    procedure loadCurrentVersion();
    procedure notify(action: EUpdaterAction);
  end;

procedure TUpdater.loadCurrentVersion();
begin
  TAsyncCalls.Invoke(procedure 
  begin 
    Assert(Windows.GetCurrentThreadId() <> System.MainThreadID);
    //Really long code
    TAsyncCalls.VCLSync(procedure begin notify(auFoundCurrentVersion); end);
  end);
end;

The assertion fails. Do I need to do something to make it run in a separate thread, or does the first example shown with the library just not actually run in threads?

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2  
I think we already did the question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/8809171/asynccall-with-delphi-2007 –  David Heffernan Sep 8 '12 at 18:56
    
In my case, I did just need to keep a reference to the returned interface. That's what I get for copying code and not understanding it. :-/ Would you like to place that as an answer or should we close as duplicate? –  Eric G Sep 10 '12 at 17:22
1  
If I were you I would upvote and accept Andreas's answer here, and upvote my answer at the other question. ;-) It's not worth me adding another answer here. –  David Heffernan Sep 10 '12 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to call IAsyncCall.ForceDifferentThread to force the code to run in a different thread. In your example the interface that TAsyncCalls.Invoke() returns is released immediately because the function ends and releasing the IAsyncCall interface calls the Sync method. And because your task hasn't started yet, the Syncmethod will execute it in the same thread, unless the ForceDifferentThread method was called.

TAsyncCalls.Invoke(procedure 
begin 
  Assert(Windows.GetCurrentThreadId() <> System.MainThreadID);
  //Really long code
  TAsyncCalls.VCLSync(procedure begin notify(auFoundCurrentVersion); end);
end).ForceDifferentThread; // <<<<<

But is that really what you want? I guess you want to keep the thread alive after loadCurrentVersion() has exited. And for this AsyncCalls isn't the right tool.

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This is close, and you're right. I did want to keep alive. The part I actually needed was to keep the returned interface in a class variable, rather than use force different thread. –  Eric G Sep 10 '12 at 17:30

That was already discussed on SO. When you call Invoke AsyncCalls puts your code into a queue to be executed; somewhat later Asyncalls will find a worker thread to execute your code, but if your code calls Sync before a worker thread was assigned to your code (and without using ForceDifferentThread) AsyncCalls removes your code from the queue and executes it in the main thread. That is by design.

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