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Let's say, in theory, I have a database with an unknown number of tables, named like:

MyTable1 MyTable2 MyTable3 ..

and so on. Each of these tables has the exact same schema. I will not know how many of these tables exist in the database.

Using EF5.0 and code-first, I want to be able to reference any one of these tables through one DbContext by passing in a parameter:

using (var db = new MyContext())
{
    db.GetMyTable(2).ForEach(e => Console.WriteLine("Table 2 entry: " + e.MyField));
    db.GetMyTable(5).ForEach(e => Console.WriteLine("Table 5 entry: " + e.MyField));
}

Is this possible?

Another way I thought of doing this would be to create completely different contexts and supply the correct .ToTable() in the mapping:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    private int _tableNumber;

    static MyContext()
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<MyContext>(null);
    }

    public MyContext(int tableNumber) : base("Name=TheContextName")
    {
        _tableNumber = tableNumber;
    }

    public DbSet<MyTable> MyTableEntries { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.Conventions.
        modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new MyTableMap(_tableNumber));
    }
}


 public class MyTableMap : EntityTypeConfiguration<MyTable>
 {
    public MyTableMap(int tableNumber)
    {
        // Primary Key
        this.HasKey(t => t.id);

        // Table & Column Mappings
        this.ToTable("MyTable" + tableNumber);
        this.Property(t => t.id).HasColumnName("id");
        this.Property(t => t.n).HasColumnName("MyField");

    }
 }

And then I could just operate with a separate context based on the table I wanted to deal with:

Console.WriteLine("Contents of MyTable1:");
using (var db = new MyContext(1))
{
    db.MyTableEntries.ToList().ForEach(n => Console.WriteLine(n.MyField));
}

Console.WriteLine("Contents of MyTable2:");
using (var db = new MyContext(2))
{
    db.MyTableEntries.ToList().ForEach(n => Console.WriteLine(n.MyField));
}

However, what happens is that OnModelCreating() in the context only gets called once on the first instantiation, so that table is always mapped to MyTable1. Is there some kind of caching that can be turned off so that OnModelCreating() gets called every time, and if so, is this a good idea? Is there a more elegant way of doing this?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I will not know how many of these tables exist in the database.

So it is not possible with single context and especially not with code first. EDMX supports this case (but EDMX designer does not) but only if you are able to define all tables in the design time. It is called MEST.

However, what happens is that OnModelCreating() in the context only gets called once on the first instantiation, so that table is always mapped to MyTable1.

Yes that is exactly what happens. Model creating is executed only once because it is very expensive operation and the model is reused for the whole application lifetime.

Is there a more elegant way of doing this?

There is a way but it is far away from elegant:

  • Create instance of DbModelBuilder` manually and fill it with all mappings you need
  • Call Build on that instance to get DbModel instance
  • Call Compile on DbModel instance to get DbCompiledModel (cache this)
  • Now pass DbCompiledModel instance to DbContext constructor

The elegant way is not using that approach and instead of that use context.Database.SqlQuery to execute your dynamic query and return instances of your type - if the query returns columns with the same names as properties in your type EF will handle it even without mapping but it will be read-only solution.

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