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Is is possible to simplify this UNION to avoid the near redundancy of the queries being unioned? As seen here, both queries are similar. They just join on a different column in table2. The reason i use Union, instead of just Inner Joining 2x in the same query is because the results must be in 1 column by virtue of the fact that this queries is used as a subquery.

SELECT t1.id as id
FROM table1 g
INNER JOIN table2 t1 on g.t_id = t1.id
WHERE g.id=1
UNION
SELECT t2.id as id2
FROM table1 g
INNER JOIN table2 t2 on g.t2_id = t2.id
WHERE g.id=1
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1  
This looks awfully similar to your previous question. What is different? –  Kermit Sep 8 '12 at 21:14
    
the difference is that the where clause is the same here. The inner join is different. The same answer does not work for both questions. –  glutz Sep 8 '12 at 21:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see why this couldn't be treated as a simple inner join that can be satisfied by a match in either of two predicates. I've removed the original table aliases of t1, t2, and g for the sake of clarity. Since I don't know if the query could produce duplicate rows, I used DISTINCT in order to collapse duplicate rows in the same manner that the UNION did in the original query.

SELECT DISTINCT table2.id
FROM table1
INNER JOIN table2
ON ( table1.t_id = table2.id OR table1.t2_id = table2.id )
WHERE table1.id = 1
;
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that's correct. thanks! –  glutz Sep 9 '12 at 12:10

It is possible to do with two joins, and the IFNULL() function:

SELECT IFNULL (t1.id, t2.id) as id
FROM table1 g
INNER JOIN table2 t1 on g.t_id = t1.id
INNER JOIN table2 t2 on g.t2_id = t2.id
WHERE g.id=1
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This query will not produce the same results as the original query, because this query requires both joins to succeed in order to appear in the result set. The original query would produce a row if either join condition was satisfied. –  Fred Sobotka Sep 9 '12 at 4:20

You might find this simpler:

select distinct t.id
from table2 t
where t.id in (select g.t_id from table1 g) or
      t.id in (select g.t2_id from table1 g)

However, the performance would be awful on MySQL. You can also do:

select distinct t.id
from table2 t
where exists (select 1 from table1 g where g.t_id = t.id or g.t2_id = t.id)

The second version should work better in MySQL.

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neither accounts for g.id = 1 –  glutz Sep 8 '12 at 23:34

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