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Assume i have a class:

class foo
{
    ....
    //some constructors here set val=34
    ....
    private:
    int val;
    int & foo::operator,()
    {
      return val;
    }
};

and i want to be able to use it as:

foo bar;
printf("  %d ", bar);   //i need to get value of bar.val
                        //with just using bar itself with
                        //using an overloading
                        //but , overloading does not work
                        //i need to get 34 without using bar.val
                        //i need this without any getter 
                        //i need val to be private

Question: Is this kind of overloading possible? If yes, how?

I tried:

int foo::operator int()
{
    return val;
}

but it says "return type may not be specifiet on a conversion function" :(

I tried:

operator int() const { return val; } 

conversion works only outside of printf & cout.

 int e=foo;
 printf(" %d ",e); //works 
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2  
operator int() should work. Conversion operator if you want terminology. –  chris Sep 8 '12 at 21:31
    
Okay, trying in a moment.. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:31
    
i got an error: return type may not be specified on a conversion function –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:35
3  
printf isn't type safe. Prefer cout. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 8 '12 at 21:36
    
@tuğrulbüyükışık, Conversion operators have no return type. They should typically be marked explicit as well (at least in C++11) and be a logical conversion. –  chris Sep 8 '12 at 21:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot overload a class, but you can use a conversion operator so that it will automatically convert to different types according to expected parameters in that context. In your case, as val is an int, you'd overload the conversion to int like this:

operator int() const { return val; }

Now wherever an int is required, and you provide a foo, this conversion is applied.

There are some limits. For example, if you pass foo to a function template where the type of the corresponding argument is generic, there will be no conversion in that place. The conversion also won't affect other expressions which don't enforce a type. As an example, if f is type foo, then &f will always be of type foo*, not int*. For most practical applications, all this is exactly what you need. But I believe that the C-style variadic printf is just such a case where there is no well-defined expected type. Better use a C++-style call, or an explicit cast static_cast<int>(f).

If neither is acceptable for you, then you are into trouble: there is no way that the C++ logic can deduce the fact that you require an int here, simply because you included a %d in some string constants. The type conversion is a compile-time thing, whereas the interpretation of format strings is done at runtime (except when generating warnings the way e.g. gcc does). The compiler won't know what type that argument needs to be, therefor it won't know what conversion to execute, therefore you have to help him in some way.

As long as this int val is the only member of foo, and there are no virtual functions either in this class, and neithe ris there a base class with any data members or a virtula function, the memory layout of an object of class foo will usually be the same as that of a plain integer. This means that the untyped C-style printf won't be able to tell the difference, even without any conversion at all. But relying on this is really bad style, so I'd advise against making use of this.

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Doesn't help for printf, which takes a variable argument list, so the compiler doesn't know it needs to convert. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 8 '12 at 21:39
    
gives error atom2.cpp(61): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int atom2.cpp(63): warning C4183: '$S1': missing return type; assumed to be a member function returning 'int' –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:40
    
trying cout with your answer gives 20-page-long errors :D –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:41
    
operator int() const { return val; } works when i use int m=foo;printf(" %d ",m); at least there is m=foo working. thanks –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:48

Do not overload comma or something as terrible. printf has ellipsis parameter so it accepts anything you feed to it, you must make sure that what you provide is correct. Keep it simple:

class foo
{
    ....
    //some constructors here set val=34
    ....
private:
    int val;
public:
    int value()
    {
      return val;
    }
};

int main()
{
    foo bar;
    printf("  %d ", bar.value());   //you get value of bar.val
}

The printf does not call any operators on your bar (including conversion operators), so these do not help you. Even if you had operator int() you should still write it like:

    printf("  %d ", (int)bar);   //you get value of bar.val

That is not much better looking. Or even:

    printf("  %d ", +bar);   //you get value of bar.val

Most confusing.

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Can i do something else without using a getter please? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:36
    
Yes i provided few examples with operator int, but these are considered worse than explicit getter. –  Öö Tiib Sep 8 '12 at 21:48
    
MvG's operator int() const { return val; } works when i use int m=foo;printf(" %d ",m); at least there is m=foo working. thanks –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:48

No, it isn't possible.

First, the comma operator doesn't apply here because the comma is used for separating the printf arguments, which takes precedence over the comma being used as an operator.

Adding a conversion operator doesn't help because the declaration of printf is

printf(const char *,...);

Which means the compiler doesn't know what type the parameters should be (other than the first), so it won't do any conversion.

share|improve this answer
    
MvG's operator int() const { return val; } works when i use int m=foo;printf(" %d ",m); at least there is m=foo working. thanks –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 8 '12 at 21:48

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