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I am trying to encrypt database columns using a certificate and a symmetric key.

I successfully created the certificate and symmetric key using the following:

CREATE CERTIFICATE MyCertificate
    ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'password'
    WITH SUBJECT = 'Public Access Data'
GO

CREATE SYMMETRIC KEY MySSNKey
    WITH ALGORITHM = AES_256
    ENCRYPTION BY CERTIFICATE MyCertificate

I tried encrypting and decrypting some data using the following:

DECLARE @Text VARCHAR(100)
SET @Text = 'Some Text'

DECLARE @EncryptedText VARBINARY(128)

-- Open the symmetric key with which to encrypt the data.
OPEN SYMMETRIC KEY MySSNKey
   DECRYPTION BY CERTIFICATE MyCertificate;

SELECT @EncryptedText = EncryptByKey(Key_GUID('MySSNKey'), @Text)

SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(100), DecryptByKey(@EncryptedText)) AS DecryptedText

When I do so, I get the following error message:

The certificate has a private key that is protected by a user defined password. That password needs to be provided to enable the use of the private key.

Ultimately, what I am trying to do is write a stored procedure that will take some unencrypted data as input, encrypt it, then store it as encrypted varbinary. Then I'd like to write a 2nd stored procedure that will do the opposite - i.e., decrypt the encrypted varbinary and convert it back to a human-readable data type. I would rather not have to specify the password directly in the stored procedure. Is there any way to do that? What am I doing wrong in my code above?

Thanks.

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You just need to use:

OPEN SYMMETRIC KEY MySSNKey
   DECRYPTION BY CERTIFICATE MyCertificate WITH PASSWORD = 'password';
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But is there a way to decrypt without specifying the password in the stored procedure? –  flayto Sep 10 '12 at 14:22
1  
You can pass the password into the stored procedure, the same way you can pass in any other string, like: WITH PASSWORD = @CertPassword. You can store it in the calling program, its config files, or whatever, but at some point you have to keep the password around somewhere unless the operator will be manually typing it in. –  SilverbackNet Sep 10 '12 at 22:17
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