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Well in my app I want to get current date and month abnd local hour (currentTimeZone hour) and depending on its value display some things.

i have read several sollutions and I have used the following:

Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance(); 
            int day=c.get(Calendar.DATE);
            int month=c.get(Calendar.MONTH);

or this

Time today = new Time(Time.getCurrentTimezone());
            today.setToNow();
            int day2=today.monthDay;
            int month2=today.month;

my questions are:

1)which of this is more "Stable" considering their results? I mean that it will not have any problem.

2)Moreover, did they both take into consideration the TimeZone? I think that the second one does, but what about the calendar?

3)I tried this code that I have found:

SimpleDateFormat s = new SimpleDateFormat("ddMMyyyyhhmmss");
            String format = s.format(new Date());

and i get the error that Date() must have an argument. weird because in every answer they use it like that.

What is wrong?

4) What do you suggest me to use? The only thing I want is a simple comparison between current month,date,hour with some stored in memory. (for example if its January 29, display that event. if it is 19.00 am send notification and so on.)

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3  
Make sure not to confuse java.util.Date with java.sql.Date - that should clear up 3) at least. –  Paul Bellora Sep 8 '12 at 22:31
1  
The Calendar.getInstance uses the default timezone. With Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone zone) you can specify the timezone. docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Calendar.html –  Bhesh Gurung Sep 8 '12 at 22:34
1  
"i get the error that Date() must have an argument" For future reference, please post the exact error message. Often paraphrasing loses critical information that we need to help you. –  Code-Apprentice Sep 8 '12 at 22:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

1) Which of this is more "Stable" considering their results? I mean that it will not have any problem.

They are both stable and very well tested, especially Calendar which is in the Java API since JDK1.1. Also from the docs of Time:

An alternative to the Calendar and GregorianCalendar classes. An instance of the Time class represents a moment in time, specified with second precision. It is modelled after struct tm, and in fact, uses struct tm to implement most of the functionality.

Time, imho, is much easier to work than Calendar though.

2) Moreover, did they both take into consideration the TimeZone? I think that the second one does, but what about the calendar?

Yes, they do. You can specify a TimeZone using Calendar.getInstance(java.util.TimeZone). Otherwise, a default one will be used.

3) I tried this code that I have found:

The code works just fine. Make sure you are using new java.util.Date() instead of java.sql.Date, for example.

4) What do you suggest me to use? The only thing I want is a simple comparison between current month,date,hour with some stored in memory. (for example if its January 29, display that event. if it is 19.00 am send notification and so on.)

It's really a matter of personal choice. Using Calendar, for example, to compare if today is January 29, you could simply use the following:

Calendar today = Calendar.getInstance();
int dayOfMonth = today.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
int month = today.get(Calendar.MONTH);
if (month == Calendar.JANUARY && dayOfMonth == 29) {
  // January 29
}
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It seems that, with Time, it can't tell us whether the week starts with Mon, Sun or Sat which depends on localisation. This can easily be achieved with Calendar via getFirstDayOfWeek(). –  Thuy Trinh May 10 '14 at 16:07

In my Android app, I am saving the date in SQLite. However, SQLite doesn't accept the Date data type. So I convert it to String like so in order to use the format YYYY-MM-DD:

            Time today = new Time(Time.getCurrentTimezone());
            today.setToNow();
            int year = today.year;
            int month = today.month;
            int day = today.monthDay;

            Calendar gregorianCalendar = new GregorianCalendar(year, month, day);
            String entryDate =  gregorianCalendar.get(Calendar.YEAR) + "-" + gregorianCalendar.get(Calendar.MONTH) + "-" + gregorianCalendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);

And it works well. I am not concerned with performance differences, as they are likely negligent.

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android.text.format.Time was deprecated in API level 22. Use GregorianCalendar instead.

Visit http://developer.android.com/reference/android/text/format/Time.html

As I know, there are some issues in Time class, such as Time.setJulianDay(int julianDay) will return a wrong value when the argument is smaller than julianDay of 1970.1.1

And some bugs also happen among April, 1987-1991 (maybe is Time.set(long millis), I cannot remember).

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