Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there any way to write a cstring literal (or variable) directly into an existing std::array?

I.e., I want to do something like this:

std::array<unsigned char, 100> test;
// std::copy("testing", test);
// test="testing";

I expect the behavior to be "copy until either a null terminator is copied or the destination buffer is full."

I was trying to avoid doing a strlcpy(test.data()... because I was looking for a way that could cope with a buffer overrun without having to explicitly include the buffer length as a parameter.

Thanks.


edit:

Here're the best solutions I've found so far from suggestions. This one only works for literals. MSVC does not have uniform initialization, so it requires the = before then {. It also requires the buffer size, but fails compilation if the buffers sizes don't match or if there is an overrun:

#include <array>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
   std::array<char, 100> arr1={"testing"};
   std::array<char, 100> arr2;
   arr2=arr1;
   std::cout << arr2.data();
}

This one works for strings in general, but be careful because the embedded null does not get copied and to have the null included you have to construct by array, ie string mystring("junk\0", 5).

#include <string>
#include <array>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  const std::string str("testing");
  std::array<char, 100> arr;
  std::copy(str.begin(), str.end(), arr.begin());
  // Note that the null terminator does not get copied.
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should do it:

std::array<unsigned char, 100> test = { "testing" };

If you use a too-large string literal, the std::array construction will fail on compile time. This won't work for non-literals though.

For non-literals, you need to check for the null terminator yourself. You could do something like std::copy(my_non_literal, my_non_literal + length_literal, test.begin());, but I think you've already come across that one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I was looking to avoid a constructor. ;) – cwm9 Sep 9 '12 at 0:37
    
@cwm9, It isn't one. std::array is an aggregate. – chris Sep 9 '12 at 0:37
    
Fair enough, but I'm trying to write into an existing memory location, not define a new one. – cwm9 Sep 9 '12 at 0:38
1  
@Rapptz, That isn't really an initializer list in the sense that std::array has no initializer constructor. – chris Sep 9 '12 at 0:44
2  
@cwm9 unnecessary copy call. liveworkspace.org/code/00cbdac9355c1d1b7685595bcf9b457b – Rapptz Sep 9 '12 at 0:50

How about something like this?

#include <string>
#include <array>
#include <algorithm>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  std::string str("testing");
  std::array<char, 100> arr;
  std::copy(str.begin(), std.end(), arr.begin());
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a nice solution too. – cwm9 Sep 9 '12 at 1:27
1  
make a note of the lack of a trailing null though. That's kind of... critical. – Mooing Duck Jul 15 '14 at 18:36

Direct operation between C strings and C++ data structures is not a problem the Standard library typically deals with. c_str() and the std::string constructor are pretty much it. You will have to manually write a loop.

share|improve this answer
#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <cstring>

int main(){

    std::array<char,100> buffer;
    char * text = "Sample text.";
    std::memcpy (buffer.data(),text,100);
    std::cout << buffer.data() << std::endl;

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You're falling off text on memcpy :P – mfontanini Sep 9 '12 at 0:48
    
Thanks, but I was trying to avoid the explicit 100 in the memcpy in case the size changes later. – cwm9 Sep 9 '12 at 0:54
    
that's why you have const variables. – Benjamin Sep 9 '12 at 0:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.