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Possible Duplicate:
“invalid use of incomplete type” error with partial template specialization

Why is it that I can do this:

template <typename T>
struct A
{
    void foo(int);
};

template <>
void A<int>::foo(int)
{
}

but not this:

template <typename> struct C {};

template <typename T>
struct A
{
    void foo(int);
};

template <typename T>
void A<C<T> >::foo(int)
{
}

For the second case, GCC gives the following error:

test.cpp:10:23: error: invalid use of incomplete type 'struct A<C<T> >'
test.cpp:4:8: error: declaration of 'struct A<C<T> >'

EDIT:

When explaining why the second example is not allowed, please also consider that making the member function also a template has no effect on which example works and which does not. That is, this still works:

template <typename T>
struct A
{
    template <typename U>
    void foo(U);
};

template <>
template <typename U>
void A<int>::foo(U)
{
}

but this does not:

template <typename> struct C {};

template <typename T>
struct A
{
    template <typename U>
    void foo(U);
};

template <typename T>
template <typename U>
void A<C<T> >::foo(U)
{
}

So the reason cannot be that function templates can only be fully specialized, because the third example is not a full specialization (the template parameter U is still there), and yet it works.

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marked as duplicate by Mankarse, mfontanini, Ben Jackson, HighCommander4, Joe Sep 9 '12 at 12:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@Mankarse that seems to be a different issue. –  Drew Dormann Sep 9 '12 at 1:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Function templates can only be specialised completely, not partially.

You're using the fact that member functions of class templates are themselves function templates, so this rule still applies.


As for your edit: The following things can be explicitly (i.e. completely) specialized, from 14.7.3/1:

An explicit specialization of any of the following:

— function template

— class template

member function of a class template

— static data member of a class template

— member class of a class template

— member enumeration of a class template

— member class template of a class or class template

member function template of a class or class template

can be declared by a declaration introduced by template<>;

I've emphasized the two statements that apply to your case. Absent any other explicit provisions, those entities can not be specialized partially.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I buy this explanation. Suppose I make the member function itself a template, with template parameter U. Then I can still define A<int>::foo(U), but not A<C<T>>::foo(U). However, the first can hardly be considered a full specialization, as it has a template parameter (U). –  HighCommander4 Sep 9 '12 at 1:57
    
@HighCommander4: I said "member function", not "member template". If you change the question, I change the answer :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 9 '12 at 1:59
    
Done, please see my edit :) –  HighCommander4 Sep 9 '12 at 2:04
    
@HighCommander4: OK. Make sure you understand that A<T>::foo in its entirety is treated as a function template. There is no analogous concept for any other kind of class member, whether it be, value, type or template. Only member functions are special. –  Kerrek SB Sep 9 '12 at 2:08
    
Got it, thanks! –  HighCommander4 Sep 9 '12 at 2:10

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