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Suppose I have an object model somewhat like this:

public class MyModel
{
    public List<long> TotalItems { get; set; }
    public List<long> ItemsApples { get; set; }
    public List<long> ItemsOranges { get; set; }
    public List<long> ItemsPeaches { get; set; } 

    public void CombineItems()
    {

    }
}

Now in reality, there are about 14 lists of longs in the model. What the best way to combine these lists so that TotalItems is the list of all other lists combined.

Thanks for your suggestions.

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14 lists of longs on one model? I suppose that could be an ideal solution to something but I did raise an eyebrow. –  ChaosPandion Sep 9 '12 at 1:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create a new List<long>, then call AddRange() to add each of your existing lists to it.

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Is AddRange going to copy the values or just create references? –  frenchie Sep 9 '12 at 1:26
    
@frenchie: long is a value type; it will always be copied. –  SLaks Sep 9 '12 at 2:22
    
ok, thanks for the clarification. –  frenchie Sep 9 '12 at 2:23
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

public class MyModel
{
    public List<long> TotalItems
    {
        get
        {
            return ItemsApples.Concat(ItemsOranges).Concat(ItemsPeaches).ToList(); // all lists conbined, including duplicates
            //return ItemsApples.Union(ItemsOranges).Union(ItemsPeaches).ToList(); // set of all items
        }
    }

    public List<long> ItemsApples { get; set; }

    public List<long> ItemsOranges { get; set; }

    public List<long> ItemsPeaches { get; set; }

    public void CombineItems()
    {

    }
}
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1  
An implementation like that should be as a method and have the type IEnumerable<long> so it is clear to the caller that this is calculated on demand. –  ChaosPandion Sep 9 '12 at 1:31
    
And we should always code against interfaces, and we should use namespaces, and using statements should be within the namespace blocks... –  Pencho Ilchev Sep 9 '12 at 1:34
    
I've failed to understand the intent of your comment. I think the ellipsis means you are annoyed by my comment? –  ChaosPandion Sep 9 '12 at 2:15

Unless you need all of the items at once (as opposed to enumerating over them), I'd do something like this instead:

public IEnumerable<long> TotalItems 
{
    get 
    {
        foreach(var i in ItemsApples) 
            yield return i;
        foreach(var i in ItemsOranges)
            yield return i;
        foreach(var i in ItemsPeaches)
            yield return i;
    }
}

From there, if you want to never maintain the class again beyond adding or removing lists of longs, you can have some fun with reflection:

public IEnumerable<long> TotalItems
{
    get
    {
        // this automatically discovers properties of type List<long>
        // and grabs their values
        var properties = from property in GetType().GetProperties()
                    where typeof(List<long>).IsAssignableFrom(property.PropertyType)
                    select (IEnumerable<long>)property.GetValue(this, null);

        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            foreach (var value in property)
                yield return value;
        }
    }
}
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