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I'm running a MySQL query via a command-line PHP script (prepared query using PDO on the mysqlnd driver). It's a simple query with a single left-join, returning 100 rows and 7 small columns per row.

When I run this query in the MySQL CLI (on the same machine running the PHP script in question), it takes 0.10 seconds -- even with the SQL_NO_CACHE flag thrown in.

When I run this query, prepared, through PDO, it takes over 9 seconds. This is execute() only -- not including the time it takes for the fetch call.

An example of my query:

SELECT HEX(al.uuid) hexUUID, al.created_on,
    IFNULL(al.state, 'ON') actionType, pp.publishers_id publisher_id,
    pp.products_id product_id, al.action_id, al.last_updated
FROM ActionAPI.actionLists al
LEFT JOIN ActionAPI.publishers_products pp
    ON al.publisher_product_id = pp.id
WHERE (al.test IS NULL OR al.test = 0)
    AND (al.created_on >= :since OR al.last_updated >= :since)
ORDER BY created_on ASC
LIMIT :skip, 100;

I don't believe the query is at fault, considering every native MySQL client I've tried has run it near-instantly, but here's the EXPLAIN for kicks:

+----+-------------+-------+--------+-------------------------+------------+---------+-----------------------------------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys           | key        | key_len | ref                               | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+-------------------------+------------+---------+-----------------------------------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | al    | index  | created_on,last_updated | created_on | 8       | NULL                              |  100 | Using where |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | pp    | eq_ref | PRIMARY                 | PRIMARY    | 4       | ActionAPI.al.publisher_product_id |    1 |             |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+-------------------------+------------+---------+-----------------------------------+------+-------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

What in the world is PDO doing that is taking 8.9 seconds?

EDIT: As stated in the comments, I've written a mysql_query version of this as well, and it has the same poor performance. Removing part of the WHERE clause, however, makes it run as fast as the MySQL client. Read on for mind-boggling details.

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3  
Just for kicks, would you mind running it with mysql_query() one time to see if it's a PDO thing? –  David Sep 9 '12 at 4:13
4  
Again, "just for kicks." It's just to see if it's a PDO thing. –  David Sep 9 '12 at 4:16
1  
Then we know it's not a PDO thing... Tough crowd. –  David Sep 9 '12 at 4:20
1  
No, you know it's just as slow as a mysql binding which we know it was heavily unoptimized and it's not maintained any longer. Using mysql could lead to more confusion, if you have programmed for long enough, you know how to isolate problems. –  Flavius Sep 9 '12 at 4:22
1  
Can you try to remove parts of the query (one of the WHERE clauses, the ORDER, the LIMIT, HEX/ISNULL result fields) one by one and see if that makes a difference? –  DCoder Sep 9 '12 at 4:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Giving a very belated update on this question:

I've not found the cause, but it turns out the EXPLAIN was different in PHP versus on the CLI. I'm not sure if any aspect of the connection would cause MySQL to choose to use a different field for the index, because as far as I know those things shouldn't be related; but alas, PHP's EXPLAIN showed that the proper index was not being used, while the CLI's did.

The solution in this (baffling) case is to use index hinting. See the 'FROM' line in this modified query from my example:

SELECT HEX(al.uuid) hexUUID, al.created_on,
    IFNULL(al.state, 'ON') actionType, pp.publishers_id publisher_id,
    pp.products_id product_id, al.action_id, al.last_updated
FROM ActionAPI.actionLists al USE INDEX (created_on)
LEFT JOIN ActionAPI.publishers_products pp
    ON al.publisher_product_id = pp.id
WHERE (al.test IS NULL OR al.test = 0)
    AND (al.created_on >= :since OR al.last_updated >= :since)
ORDER BY created_on ASC
LIMIT :skip, 100;

Hope this helps someone!

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At a guess its your connection char type settings not maching the table or columns char type. Mysql Sometimes igores the index when its doesnt think it can use the index because of the char set differences. –  exussum Jan 24 at 17:35

PDO uses resources to manipulates row results. Par that with an interpreted language (PHP) and you will have script that takes longer to process than it does for MySQL to return your results.

NOTE: Using mysql_select_db() or mysqli_select_db() is much faster than PDO.

To learn more about faster PHP Queries, see: PHP: What's the fastest way to query MySQL? Because PDO is painfully slow

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2  
Absolutely, I'd expect PDO to run slower than MySQL. But I've been programming with PHP/MySQL for years, and an overhead of 90x the query time for such a simple result set is far, far more than what can be explained away by the interpreted language layer. There's got to be something more going on here. –  Tom Frost Sep 9 '12 at 4:30
    
Well, I guess the idea is that mysqli can't hurt, in response to @Flavious in the OP's comment thread. –  David Sep 9 '12 at 4:41

I hit to the same problem. Same query was acting differently when launched from cli and from PHP. Explain in cli mentioned correct index usage, in PHP there was nothing. As I have found, the problem was type casting, in my case it was datetime. After I have specifically cast type for compared value eg. where datetime_column > cast('2014-01-12 12:30:01' as datetime) everything works.

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When your connecting on the command line its VERY likely to be using a different charicter set that when your connecting with PHP.

When your asking it to use an index, It will and because the char sets are close enough to not cause an issue (at a guess ? It depends on your set up of the table and columns)

Try thowing some unicode charicters in there and it will likely start to return bad results.

Make sure the the char set matches on the connection, the table and the column for best results. If They cant be done, The connection is the most important

UTF-8 vs Latin1 mysql, indexes not used on utf-8

Has some more info

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