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I'm trying to write a multi-threaded mergesort, and I'm having what to me are very confusing issues. I'm not fully aware of the rules of how threads share/use variables...

For example, if within a runnable class, I create another instance of that Runnable and pass it one of my arrays as a parameter, do edits that class makes transfer? It appears as if they do, but it also appears as if I'm having unexpected behavior.

Here is my code:

public class PSort implements Runnable {

private int [] Arr;
private int begin;
private int end;

public void run () {
    // Base Case - Insertion sort
    if(this.end-this.begin <= 10) {
        InsertionSort();
    }
    else {
        int left_start  = this.begin;
        int left_end    = this.begin + (this.end-this.begin)/2;
        int right_start = this.begin + (this.end-this.begin)/2 + 1;
        int right_end   = this.end;


        Thread t1 = new Thread(new PSort(this.Arr, left_start, left_end));
        Thread t2 = new Thread(new PSort(this.Arr, right_start, right_end));
        t1.start();
        t2.start();

        try {
            t1.join();
            t2.join();

            merge(left_start, left_end, right_start, right_end);
        } catch (Exception e) {}
    }
}

public PSort (int[] A, int begin, int end) {
    this.Arr = A;
    this.begin = begin;
    this.end = end;
    System.out.println("New thread: " + this.begin + " " + this.end);
}

public static void ParallelSort (int[] A, int begin, int end) {

    PSort psort = new PSort(A, begin, end);
    Thread thread = new Thread(psort);

    thread.start();

    try {
        thread.join();
        psort.printArray();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
}

public void printArray() {
    int count = 0;
    for(int x = this.begin; x < this.end; x++) {
        if(count < 10) {
            System.out.print(Arr[x] + " ");
            count++;
        }
        else {
            count = 1;
            System.out.print("\n" + Arr[x] + " ");
        }
    }
}

private void InsertionSort () {
    for(int x = this.begin; x < this.end; x++) {
        int currentNum = this.Arr[x];
        int hole = x;
        while((hole > 0) && (this.Arr[hole-1] > currentNum)) {
            this.Arr[hole] = this.Arr[hole-1];
            hole = hole - 1;
        }
        this.Arr[hole] = currentNum;
    }
}

private void merge (int left_start, int left_end, int right_start, int right_end) {
    /*
    int length = right_end - left_start;

    int[] temp = new int[length];
    int leftP = left_start;
    int rightP = right_start;
    int index = 0;

    while((leftP <= left_end) && (rightP < right_end)) {
        if(Arr[leftP] < Arr[rightP]) {
            temp[index++] = Arr[leftP++];
        }
        else {
            temp[index++] = Arr[rightP++];
        }
    }   
    while(leftP <= left_end) {
        temp[index++] = Arr[leftP++];
    }
    while(rightP < right_end) {
        temp[index++] = Arr[rightP++];
    }

    System.arraycopy(temp, 0, Arr, left_start, length);
    */

}
}

Now, I am calling PSort.ParallelSort with a size-40 array filled with random integers 0-9, and this is the output I get:

New thread: 0 40
New thread: 0 20
New thread: 21 40
New thread: 0 10
New thread: 11 20
New thread: 21 30
New thread: 31 40
0 1 1 2 2 2 6 7 7 8 
8 3 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 7 
9 2 3 3 3 4 7 8 9 9 
2 2 6 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 

Notice that I have commented out the "merge" section of my routine, so I would expect each individual line of output to be correctly sorted, but that is not the case. I tested the InsertionSort by itself, and it doesn't seem to ever fail, so there seem to be some concurrency issues at work here which I'm completely ignoring.

Note: I realize there are some more serious problems at work here, because the higher numbers are weighted towards the last two rows of the overall array, even though I'm not merging...

share|improve this question
    
Haven't read the whole question, but if I were you I would split the array in n, array.length/n smaller arrays and merge sort them in n threads without sharing anything. This is nlog(n/t) where t is number of threads. It make more sense in multi-core processors. In single core they'll be queued anyways. The main thread will wait until all the threads has returned and then will merge the sub-arrays (now sorted by the threads) in the main thread. (O(n)) Making your program O((n/c)log(n/t)) + O(n) where n is array.length, c core, t threads. Slightly beneficial not great. –  Nishant Sep 9 '12 at 4:58
    
Ah, I believe I see what you're saying, but I'm doing this for an assignment that seems to explicitly state splitting it in two. I don't think I'm understanding what's being shared in this case, because it looks like there are concurrency issues. :( –  TSM Sep 9 '12 at 5:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The bug is in your InsertionSort method (which should be named starting with a lower-case letter, by the way):

int hole = x;
while ((hole > 0) && /* ... */) {
    // ...
    hole--;
}

So you're starting at x, which is within the assigned segment, but moving back to 0, so all the threads end up writing on the same segments. Yes, the data is shared between the threads, that's the difficulty when multi-threading.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help! I had numerous other errors in the program, including a misunderstanding of how Java handles pass-by-value for objects, but I think I've got it all figured out and working now. Thanks again! If you do have the chance to answer again, would you mind letting me know something...so in my program I am writing to the same object with multiple different threads. Is this not advised? Would one normally provide a separate class and synchronous access methods to do such a thing? I assume it's not a problem here because two threads never write to the same index in the array. –  TSM Sep 9 '12 at 7:08
    
@TSM You have to know what you do. Multiple threads can access different "parts" of an object (fields, array indices) without any kind of synchronization not only if they never write to the same, but also if they never read it. –  Frank Pavageau Sep 9 '12 at 13:50

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