Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why isn't this working?:

        var surveys = db.Surveys.Where(s => s.Author.UserId == user.UserId);

        return from survey in surveys
               select new
               {
                   surveyId = survey.SurveyId,
                   title = survey.Title
               };

And this, with a minor change, is?:

        var surveys = db.Surveys.Where(s => s.Author == user);

        return from survey in surveys
               select new
               {
                   surveyId = survey.SurveyId,
                   title = survey.Title
               };

It throws a serialization error

The 'ObjectContent`1' type failed to serialize the response body for content type 
'application/xml; charset=utf-8'.  (...)




I'm fine with solving it that way, but I have the same error here (below), and can't solve it the same way:

var surveys = db.Surveys.Where(s => s.AnswerableBy(user));
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

I ran into this issue recently, in my case the problem was that I had circular references created by the Entity Framework - Model First (Company -> Employee -> Company).

I resolved it by simply creating a view model object that had only the properties I needed.

share|improve this answer

As per the section 'Handling Circular Object References' here on the Microsoft ASP.NET Web API website, add the following lines of code to the Register method of your WebAPIConfig.cs file (should be in the App_Start folder of your project).

        var json = config.Formatters.JsonFormatter;
        json.SerializerSettings.PreserveReferencesHandling = Newtonsoft.Json.PreserveReferencesHandling.Objects;
        config.Formatters.Remove(config.Formatters.XmlFormatter);

There are separate instructions on that page for dealing with XML parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
then, my response to webapi, was in json, but, is better for me –  matias.berrueta Jan 25 '13 at 19:26
    
Perhaps some more explanation how and why this solves the problem would be appropriate. It doesn't seem obvious to me. –  s.bandara Jan 25 '13 at 19:52
    
Bandara, I edited the post for you. –  Ciaran Gallagher Feb 22 '13 at 22:24

The exception you are seeing is a general exception, which can be caused by any number of factors. Check the InnerException property of the serialization exception to find out what exactly caused the serialization to fail.

share|improve this answer
    
"Type 'System.Linq.Enumerable+WhereSelectEnumerableIterator2[MySln.Models.Survey,<>f__‌​AnonymousType02[System.Int32,System.String]]' cannot be serialized. Consider marking it with the DataContractAttribute attribute, and marking all of its members you want serialized with the DataMemberAttribute attribute. If the type is a collection, consider marking it with the CollectionDataContractAttribute. See the Microsoft .NET Framework documentation for other supported types." But I don't want to serialize a "Survey", but a subset of properties of this (thats why i'm using dynamic) –  sports Sep 9 '12 at 14:26
    
Edit: Ok, thanks, the problem was that IsAnswerable(·) couldn' be translated into a LINQ query. Now I really don't know how to solve this without modifying the architecture, damn' it. –  sports Sep 9 '12 at 14:55
1  
A common trick is to add a ToList call to the call chain. This forces LINQ to execute the query and pull all data in memory. For example: var surveys = db.Surveys.ToList().Where(s => s.AnswerableBy(user)); –  Martin Devillers Sep 9 '12 at 16:53
1  
I must add that shifting query execution from LINQ-to-SQL to LINQ-to-Objects has some obvious drawbacks. In most scenarios you will lose performance as SQL is better equipped to manage queries. If your Surveys table is going to contain millions of rows, then pulling all that data in memory before applying a filter is an inefficient solution. –  Martin Devillers Sep 9 '12 at 17:07
    
whooaa that helped! Thank you Martin Devillers. I am indeed going to have millions of rows, but for now I'm fine with a nice clean code. –  sports Sep 9 '12 at 22:11

You are using an anonymous object. Make it strongly typed and the serialization will work.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you could even do a Dictionary<int, string> if you wanted to. –  Joe Jan 22 '13 at 21:25

At the end this has to do with Linq to Entities vs Linq to Objects.

Some LINQ queries can not be translated into SQL (like using a method: someCollection.Where(p => p.SomeMethod() == ...)). So they must be translated to memory first (someCollection.ToList().Where...)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.