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I wrote a function which works for hundreds of cases but fails in some cases.

Here is the C function:

unsigned negate_number(unsigned x) {
  int sign = (!(x & 0x80000000))<<31;
  int other = 0x7FFFFFFF & x;
  return (sign | other);
}

I am just masking sign, inverting it and doing a OR (joining) with masked exponent and mantessa. So this should work in all cases.

But here is a case where it fails: x = 0x7fc00000 (2143289344)

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1  
Why are you asking about 'floating number' in the title when the code is working with integers? Are you trying to call the function with a float and treat it as an array of bits, more or less? If so, you're on a hiding to nothing! If you call the function with a prototype in scope, the C compiler will convert the float to an unsigned int. If you don't call it with a prototype in scope, the C compiler will convert the float to a double before calling the function. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 5:20
    
It is a 32 bit IEEE 754 single precision number. So I am just flipping the most significant bit (sign bit). –  Anon Sep 9 '12 at 5:25
1  
This fails for NaN (not a number) inputs. How can it be made fail-safe for these cases? –  Anon Sep 9 '12 at 5:34
    
@Anon if you complement the sign of a NaN, it's still a NaN - unless other code is broken and fails to detect that kind of NaN. –  harold Sep 9 '12 at 11:12

1 Answer 1

I asked:

Why are you asking about 'floating number' in the title when the code is working with integers? Are you trying to call the function with a float and treat it as an array of bits, more or less? If so, you're on a hiding to nothing! If you call the function with a prototype in scope, the C compiler will convert the float to an unsigned int. If you don't call it with a prototype in scope, the C compiler will convert the float to a double before calling the function.

And the response was:

It is a 32 bit IEEE 754 single precision number. So I am just flipping the most significant bit (sign bit).

To flip the most significant bit of a 32-bit (unsigned integer) quantity, you could simply write:

x ^= 0x80000000;

However, as I indicated, you are simply not getting passed a 32-bit float unless you are lying to your compiler. You could 'get it to work' (on some machines, some of the time) if you had:

Bogus Code

fileA.c

extern float negate_number(float x);

...
float f1 = 3.14159;
float f2 = negate_number(f1);
...

fileB.c

unsigned negate_number(unsigned x)
{
    return x ^ 0x80000000;
}

However, you are playing with fire and fibbing to your compiler. Compilers hate being lied to and often find a way to get their own back. Do Not Do This!

Mostly kosher code

To achieve more or less the effect you want with a minimum of issues (but not 'no issues'), you probably need:

fileB.c

float negate_number(float f)
{
    union { unsigned x; float y; } u;
    u.y = f;
    u.x ^= 0x80000000;
    return u.y;
}

Strictly, reading and writing to u.x after assigning to u.y is undefined behaviour, but it will normally do what you want; similarly with returning u.y after manipulating u.x.

All of this assumes that the bit layout of float and unsigned are such that the sign bit of the float is the most significant bit of the unsigned.

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I cannot use float as the type. I have to work with unsigned int as the type. But the input will be a 32-bit single precision floating point number (IEEE 754). –  Anon Sep 9 '12 at 5:43
    
You are not understanding what I write. The input to the function cannot be a 32-bit float. You can do the union stuff out in the calling code and pass u.x to your function. Or you can do the union stuff in negate_number(). But you can't do it the way your code is written. (Or, at the very least, I don't think you can do it the way your code is written.) [...to be continued...] –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 5:47
    
[...continuing...] Now, if you have an unsigned in your calling code that contains the bit pattern corresponding to some float value, then of course you may pass that unsigned int to the function with the unsigned argument and unsigned return value, and then you can use the version of negate_number() marked as 'Bogus'. But you should be clear that you are passing an unsigned (that happens to contain the same bit pattern as some float) and not a float per se. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 5:49
    
Yes, the inputs are unsigned ints thats contain some corresponding float values including Nan(not a number) which need to be returned if the are thrown as input. –  Anon Sep 9 '12 at 5:52
    
OK; so you are passing unsigned values around. You should be much clearer in your question! According to the Wikipedia, you can flip the sign bit of a NaN without really affecting it. If you don't want to attempt (or risk) changing a NaN, detect the NaN pattern ((x & 0x7F100000) == 0x7F100000) and leave the value unchanged. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 5:57

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