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From this question I learned how to color Python. I figured out all the color codes, don't worry.
Anyway, the answer that worked for me was the ctypes one by orip. It's a bit tiresome to have to have to type ctypes.windll.kernel32.SetConsoleTextAttribute(handle, AQUA) every time I want to color text. Is there a way to convert it into a function? I'm not sure how to send variables through functions, and not sure how to implement them, even if I did.
Thanks in advance! -ghostmancer All that matters for me is that it works for me - I'm not planning to give my script away. My colors:

BLACK    = 0x0000
BLUE    = 0x0001
GREEN    = 0x0002
RED    = 0x0004
PURPLE    = 0x0005
YELLOW    = 0x0006
WHITE    = 0x0007
GRAY    = 0x0008
GREY    = 0x0008
AQUA    = 0x0009 #Very Blue
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Shouldn't that be 0x3? And 0xb for the light version? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 9 '12 at 5:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ummm... if i understand right ...

def a_func(handle,color):
   ctypes.windll.kernel32.SetConsoleTextAttribute(handle, color)

a_func(handle,AQUA)

or even better

colorFunc = ctypes.windll.kernel32.SetConsoleTextAttribute
colorFunc(handle,AQUA)
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Second example is very nice - thanks! –  ghostmancer Sep 9 '12 at 5:38

no need to create a new function with def or lambda, just assign the function with a long name to a shorter name, e.g:

textcolor = ctypes.windll.kernel32.SetConsoleTextAttribute
textcolor(handle, color)
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+1 This is the best way to do it. –  Ray Toal Sep 9 '12 at 22:37

One way is

def textcolor(handle, color):
    ctypes.windll.kernel32.SetConsoleTextAttribute(handle, color)

which you call like so:

textcolor(handle, AQUA)
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You can use:

f=lambda handle,color:ctypes.windll.kernel32.SetConsoleTextAttribute(handle, color)

and, call f(<Actual handle object>, <color>) wherever you want. e.g. f(handle, AQUA) would be the required call

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