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I guess there is no difference between these three parts of code, is not it?

   try
    {
       // .............
    }
    catch
    {
        // ............. 
    }

and

   try
    {
       // .............
    }
    catch(Exception)
    {
       // .............  
    }

and

try
{
   // .............
}
catch(Exception e)
{
    // ............. 
}

However I am almost savvy when should be used the first one and when - the second. But I would like you to tell your ideas.

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up vote 14 down vote accepted

The first one will also catch thrown objects that aren't exceptions.
(this can happen from non-CLS-compliant code)

The second one will not give a compiler warning if you don't actually use the exception variable.

The third one should be used only if you actually need to inspect the thrown exception (eg, to log it).

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As of .NET 2.0, the first and second examples are the same. non-CLS compliant exceptions are now wrapped by RuntimeWrappedException, which derives from Exception. – dbarros Nov 25 '14 at 4:36

Those bits of code are quite a bit different.

The first does not allow you to take any information from the exception that occurred. It will catch anything, but you won't have any clue what was caught.

The second does not allow you to do anything, but at least lets you specify what kind of exception. In your example, since you have indicated Exception, it will catch everything that derives from Exception. But it could be altered to fine-tune what is caught - but still permit you to do nothing with it.

the third lets you actually access the exception and get info from it.

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<<. It will catch anything>> what do mean by "anything"? – Alexandre Sep 9 '12 at 6:46
    
@AlexMaslakov I mean, literally, anything. Which is why I used the word. It will even catch non-exceptions, should some bit of non-cls-compliant code manage to throw a non-exception. – Andrew Barber Sep 9 '12 at 6:51

The 3rd case is actually this:

When an exception occurs at a line in your try block, an object of corresponding exception is created. The catch block containing (Exception e) is actually having an Exception class variable e as its parameter. The exception object's reference is then copied to this reference variable. You can now use this e variable as per your need like to identify the type of exception raised, for example e.message() gives the description associated with the exception.

The first and the second cases has been very well explained by Slaks

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It depends. I don't know of a difference between the first two.

If you want to use the exception in the catch block, i.e. get the stack trace or other information, you would have to use the last one so you have an object to reference.

If you're just throwing the exception for someone else to handle, you wouldn't need it.

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