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I have some code which makes use of generics internally. Everything is fine so far, until the point where functionality is exposed via a public API. The problem is identical to the following toy example: I have a List of wrapped items with a specific subtype (T extends Number in this example). When I want to return this List, I am currently returning a List<Wrapper<? extends Number>> which makes client code very verbose.

Is there a possibility of changing the return type to List<Wrapper<Number>>? Clients do not need to know, that Wrappers contain any specific type of Number. I tried several approaches with casting, but they all fail with compile errors.

public static List<Wrapper<? extends Number>> getNumbers() {
    Wrapper<Integer> number1 = new Wrapper<Integer>(1);
    Wrapper<Double> number2 = new Wrapper<Double>(2.);

    List<Wrapper<? extends Number>> numbers = new ArrayList<Wrapper<? extends Number>>();
    numbers.add(number1);
    numbers.add(number2);
    return numbers;
}

class Wrapper<T extends Number> {
    private final T item;
    Wrapper(T item) {
        this.item = item;
    }
    T getItem() {
        return item;
    }
}
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3 Answers

Based on what you have shown about your Wrapper type, Wrapper<? extends Number> is exactly what you want for your case, since it is only possible to get items out of your Wrapper (it is a producer), and not possible to put items in. So when you call getItem() on a Wrapper<? extends Number>, it returns a Number, which is what you want. How does it not fit your need?

"Verbose" is not a legitimate reason to not throw away type safety.

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In my case I am not using Number but subtypes of a specific type in my library. Via API I do not want to expose the fact, that these subtypes exist, but the ? extends exactly suggests that. Keeping code short and readable is definitely a goal, but I agree on the "producer" aspect. I understand that it is "cheating", but could you hilight the actual implications? Another solution seems to be to "re-wrap" all items in numbers into a newly created Wrapper<Number> but is this really different? –  qqilihq Sep 9 '12 at 10:13
    
+1. The OP should change the client code...or even better, avoid this abuse of generics at all... –  Louis Wasserman Sep 9 '12 at 13:51
    
@qqilihq: ? extends X means either X or its subtype. It does not necessarily imply that there exists subtypes of X. For example, you could write ? extends String but there cannot be any subtypes of String. From a generics point of view, you should use ? extends because nothing in your code depends on the type parameter being exactly that type. –  newacct Sep 9 '12 at 21:13
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I just found out that the following approach works. Any feedback and comments about potential pitfalls still very appreciated.

public static List<Wrapper<Number>> getNumbers() {
    Wrapper<Integer> number1 = new Wrapper<Integer>(1);
    Wrapper<Double> number2 = new Wrapper<Double>(2.);
    List<Wrapper<? extends Number>> numbers = new ArrayList<Wrapper<? extends Number>>();
    numbers.add(number1);
    numbers.add(number2);
    return (List<Wrapper<Number>>)(List<?>)numbers;
}
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This is wrong. A Wrapper<Integer> is not a Wrapper<Number>, even though an Integer is a Number. So what you are doing is lying to the type system. –  newacct Sep 9 '12 at 9:12
    
Also, if you are going to do this, why not just declare number1 and number2 to be Wrapper<Number>? Then you wouldn't need to do any crazy casting. –  newacct Sep 9 '12 at 21:14
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To my knowledge it is not possible if you want to return T. You cannot return a subtype of T when you want to return T

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