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Edit: If someone could provide an explained recursive answer(a link would do) to the famous coin change problem this would help a LOT


For a given cent amount, minimize the number of coin-tubes if all tubes can hold 64 coins.

each tube can ONLY hold a single type of coin.

each tube does NOT need to be fully filled.


e.g. for american coins the amounts would be $0.01, $0.05, $0.10, $0.25, $0.50, and $1.00

6 cents could be done as 6 1cent coins in a single tube,

25 cents could be a tube with a single 25c coin or a tube with five 5c coins.

65 cents would be done as 13 5c coins, as 65 1c coins would need to use 2 tubes.


I'm attempting to write a minecraft plugin, and I am having a LOT of difficulty with this algorithm.

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1  
what have you tried ? show some code, describe the problem ! –  Yahia Sep 9 '12 at 8:27
    
It seems that a simple brute force approach should be good enough, unless you're wanting to deal with very large amounts of money ? –  Paul R Sep 9 '12 at 8:32
    
Honestly? I'm very new to programming and have little idea where to start, I've tried thinking about somehow modifying a greedy approach, had thought about brute-forcing the problem but i was having troubles even getting the combinations given the amount or finding an example (on how to get combinations of coins from an amount) that I could understand. I've just found an example on stackoverflow that i can follow so I'll update shortly. –  Andreas Pettifer Sep 9 '12 at 8:36
    
Could the 25 cents example be done with 25 1c coins in one tube? –  Dan W Sep 10 '12 at 14:39

3 Answers 3

something like this:

a[0] = 100; //cents
a[1] = 50; a[2] = 25; a[3] = 10; a[4] = 5; a[5] = 1;

cnt[6]; //array to store how much coins of type i you use;


void rec(sum_left, p /* position in a array */) {
   if ( p == 5 ) {
      cnt[5] = sum_left;
      //count how many tubes are used by cnt array, update current answer if neccessary;
      return;
   }
   for ( int i = 0; i <= sum_left/a[p]; i++ )
      //take i coins of type a[p]
      rec(sum_left - i*a[i], p+1);
}

int main() {
   rec(sum, 0);
}
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Why is p ==5 being checked. Have you run the code ? –  dan-boa Sep 10 '12 at 9:20
    
because for a[5] = 1, there's only 1 valid variant to get the coins. no I didn't run the code –  Herokiller Sep 10 '12 at 10:25

A lookup table is a good method.

int[] Coins = new[] { 100, 50, 25, 10, 5, 1 };
int[,] Table = new int[6,6400];

/// Calculate the number of coins of each type that minimizes the number of
/// tubes used.
int[] Tubes(int cents)
{
    int[] counts = new int[Coins.Length];
    if (cents >= 6400)
    {
        counts[0] += (cents / 6400) * 64; // number of coins in filled $1-tubes
        cents %= 6400;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < Coins.Length; i++)
    {
        int count = Table[i, cents]; // N coins in (N + 63) / 64 tubes
        counts[i] += count;
        cents -= count * Coins[i];
    }
    return cents;
}

To calculate the table, you could use this:

void CalculateTable()
{
    for (int i = Coins.Length-1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        int coin = Coins[i];
        for (int cents = 0; cents < 6400; cents++)
        {
            if (i == Coins.Length-1)
            {
                // The 1 cent coin can't be divided further
                Table[i,cents] = cents;
            }
            else
            {
                // Find the count that minimizes the number of tubes.
                int n = cents / coin;
                int bestTubes = -1;
                int bestCount = 0;
                for (int count = cents / coin; count >= 0; count--)
                {
                    int cents1 = cents - count * coin;
                    int tubes = (count + 63) / 64;
                    // Use the algorithm from Tubes() above, to optimize the
                    // lesser coins.
                    for (int j = i+1; j < Coins.Length; j++)
                    {
                        int count1 = Table[j, cents1];
                        cents1 -= count1 * Coins[j];
                        tubes += (count1 + 63) / 64;
                    }
                    if (bestTubes == -1 || tubes < bestTubes)
                    {
                        bestTubes = tubes;
                        bestCount = count;
                    }
                }
                // Store the result
                Table[i,cents] = bestCount;
            }
        }
    }
}

CalculateTable runs in a few milliseconds, so you don't have to store it to disk.

Example:

Tubes(3149)  -> [ 31,  0,  0,  0,  0, 49]
Tubes (3150)  -> [  0, 63,  0,  0,  0,  0]
Tubes (31500) -> [315,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0]

The numbers mean the number of coins. N coins could be put into (N + 63)/64 tubes.

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Here is a recursive, heuristic and greedy algorithm.

In the array T, each T[i] holds an array of 6 integers.

If the given sum is 65 then you call tubes(65) and then print T[65].

coins[1..6] = {1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100}

tubes(sum)
    if sum < coins[1]
        return
    for i = 1 to 6
        tubes(sum - coins[i])
    best-tubes[1..6] = {64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64}
    for i = 1 to 6
        if sum - coins[i] >= 0
            current-tubes[1..6] = copy of T[sum - coins[i]]
            if current-tubes[i] < 64
                current-tubes[i] += 1
                if current-tubes is better than best-tubes*
                    best-tubes = current-tubes
    T[sum] = best-tubes

To vastly improve the running time, you can check if the current T[sum] has already been evaluated. Adding this check completes the approach called dynamic programming.

*current-tubes is better than best-tubes is using less tubes, or using the same number of tubes with less coins or using the same number of tubes but tubes that hold larger values. This is the greedy in action part.

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