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I am new to Ruby . I have a question with respect to using Inheritence in Ruby .

I have a class called as Doggy inside a file named Doggy.rb

class Doggy
  def bark
    puts "Vicky is barking"
  end
end

I have written another class named Puppy in another file named puppy.rb

class Puppy < Doggy
end

puts Doggy.new.bark

I am getting this Error:

Puppy.rb:1:in `<main>': uninitialized constant Doggy (NameError)

Is it mandatory to have these classes (Doggy and Puppy ) inside a single file only?

Edited

As per the suggestions , i have tried using require and require_relative as shown , but still i am getting below Error

Puppy.rb:1:in `<main>': uninitialized constant Doggy (NameError)

    class Puppy < Doggy
    end
    require_relative 'Doggy.rb'
    puts Doggy.new.bark
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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Changes to be done in puppy.rb require the file in the following way.. Assuming you have both files are in the same directory.

doggy.rb

class Doggy
  def bark
    puts "Vicky is barking"
  end
end

puppy.rb

require File.expand_path('../doggy.rb', __FILE__)
class Puppy < Doggy
end

puts Doggy.new.bark
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1  
Thank you very much Ankit , its working now . Its working with both require File.expand_path('doggy.rb') as well as with require File.expand_path('../doggy.rb', FILE) , could you please tell me whats the difference between those ? –  Preethi Jain Sep 9 '12 at 9:41
    
In current scenario both will work same... but wanted to give an idea if you have some file in your subdirectory how you can require. For eg if 'doggy.rb' was in animal/doggy.rb than File.expand_path('doggy.rb') will fail and you have to do File.expand_path('../animal/doggy.rb', __FILE__) –  AnkitG Sep 9 '12 at 9:54
    
Rather than File.expand_path I'd probably do something like $: << '.' if on an Unix-like system, not sure right now how the windows equivalent looks like. –  Cubic Sep 9 '12 at 11:06

You should require file with Doggy class in it from file where Puppy is. Put

require './doggy'

or, if you are on ruby-1.9:

require_relative 'doggy'

in puppy.rb (assuming file names are doggy.rb and puppy.rb).

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Also, in addition to what everyone else has said, puts Dog.new.bark will always fail, because your class is not called Dog, it's Doggy. Beware.

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Not necessary, you have to require the file where Doggy is declared. You can use require or require_relative.

Then, anyway make sure you use the name you declared: Doggy and not Dog.

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You are loading the file containing the definition of Doggy, after you inherit from Doggy. Of course, that cannot possibly work. How can you inherit from Doggy on line 1 if you only load the file containing the definition of Doggy on line 3?

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You have to include Doggy.rb in you Puppy class

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