Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know I can't keep a reference to the internals of an array so I was wondering if it is OK to keep a global pointer to a java array object or indeed any java object. And whether it makes any difference that I create it from the C++.

It works, but I was worried the garbage collector could potentially relocate the memory (which I understand it the reason for Get... and Release... methods on JNIEnv).

//global jfloatArray
jfloatArray jarray;

//called once
JNIEXPORT void Java_com_example_test1_Main_Init
  (JNIEnv *env, jclass thiz){
    //create once
    jarray = env->NewFloatArray(10);  //if valid, would it be as valid to pass it in?
}

//called repeatedly
JNIEXPORT void JNICALL
Java_com_example_test1_Main_loop(JNIEnv* env, jobject thiz) {    
    //use jarray in here
}

Edit:

Here is the correct code.

//global jfloatArray
jfloatArray jarray;

//called once
JNIEXPORT void Java_com_example_test1_Main_Init
  (JNIEnv *env, jclass thiz){
      //create once
      //create it - this gives a local reference
      jfloatArray local_jarray = env->NewFloatArray(10);
      //get a global reference, cast it and set to the global "jarray"
      jarray = (jfloatArray) env->NewGlobalRef(local_jarray);
      //delete the local reference
      env->DeleteLocalRef(local_jarray);
}

//called repeatedly
JNIEXPORT void JNICALL
Java_com_example_test1_Main_loop(JNIEnv* env, jobject thiz) {    
    //use jarray in here
}
share|improve this question
    
Note that you can use a native array (created with malloc or new) as a global variable in your JNI component if you never pass it to Java methods. In other situations, it is very efficient to use DirectByteBuffer class. –  Alex Cohn Sep 9 '12 at 17:39
    
@AlexCohn thanks, yes I should have made it clear that I am indeed passing to a java method. I will investigate DirectByteBuffer though, thanks. –  weston Sep 10 '12 at 8:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your reference is merely that -- a reference. It will not prevent the object it refers to from being relocated. It will prevent the object from being recollected; local references are automatically destroyed after returning, but since you're using a global variable, you should use a global reference, which necessitates manual management. See NewGlobalRef and DeleteGlobalRef.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.