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I have a simple code to convert binary to decimal numbers. In my compiler, the decomposition works just fine for number less than 1000, beyond the output is always the same 1023. Anybody has an idea ?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

// how many power of ten is there in a number 
// (I don't use the pow() function to avoid trouble with floating numbers)
int residu(int N)
{
    int i=0;
    while(N>=1){
        N=N/10;
        i++;
    }
    return i;
}

//exponentiating a number a by a number b
int power(int a, int b){
    int i;
    int res=1;
    for (i=0;i<b;i++){res=a*res;}
    return res;
}

//converting a number N
int main()
{
    int i;

    //the number to convert
    int N;
    scanf("%d",&N);

    //the final decimal result
    int res=0;
    //we decompose N by descending powers of 10, and M is the rest
    int M=0;

    for(i=0;i<residu(N);i++){
        // simple loop to look if there is a power of (residu(N)-1-i) in N, 
        // if yes we increment the binary decomposition by 
        // power(2,residu(N)-1-i)
        if(M+ power(10,residu(N)-1-i) <= N)
        {
            M = M+power(10,residu(N)-1-i);
            res=power(2,residu(N)-1-i)+res;
        }
    }
    printf("%d\n",res);
}
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Did you try to debug your program with a debugger? On Linux that would mean compile with gcc -g -Wall and then use gdb on the binary. –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 9 '12 at 11:14
    
no I didin't, I use Xcode as a compiler –  user1611830 Sep 9 '12 at 11:16
2  
Don't write else{}, please. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '12 at 11:17
    
There should be a way to compile with debugging information and to use some debugger on your system. –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 9 '12 at 11:17
    
I am really new to xcode, and it seems rather non intuitive to activate the debugger console but why I have been downvoted ? –  user1611830 Sep 9 '12 at 11:38
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes try this :

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) 
{ 
char bin; int dec = 0;

while (bin != '\n') { 
scanf("%c",&bin); 
if (bin == '1') dec = dec * 2 + 1; 
else if (bin == '0') dec *= 2; } 

printf("%d\n", dec); 

return 0;

}
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Yes thanks, it works fine and it is very simple ! –  user1611830 Sep 9 '12 at 12:16
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Most likely this is because you are using an int to store your binary number. An int will not store numbers above 2^31, which is 10 digits long, and 1023 is the largest number you can get with 10 binary digits.

It would be much easier for you to read your input number as a string, and then process each character of the string.

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Why the downvote ? –  b0fh Sep 14 '12 at 15:01
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After a little experimentation, I think that your program is intended to accept a number consisting of 1's and 0's only as a base-10 number (the %d reads a decimal number). For example, given input 10, it outputs 2; given 1010, it outputs 10; given 10111001, it outputs 185.

So far, so good. Unfortunately, given 1234, it outputs 15, which is a little unexpected.

If you are running on a machine where int is a 32-bit signed value, then you can't enter a number with more than 10 digits, because you overflow the limit of a 32-bit int (which can handle ±2 billion, in round terms). The scanf() function doesn't handle overflows well.

You could help yourself by echoing your inputs; this is a standard debugging technique. Make sure the computer got the value you are expecting.

I'm not going to attempt to fix the code because I think you're going about the problem in completely the wrong way. (I'm not even sure whether it's best described as binary to decimal, or decimal to binary, or decimal to binary to decimal!) You would do better to read the input as a string of (up to 31) characters, then validate that each one is either a 0 or a 1. Assuming that's correct, then you can process the string very straight-forwardly to generate a value which can be formatted by printf() as a decimal.

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Shift left is the same than multiply by 2 and is more efficient, so I think it is a more c-like answer:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int bin2int(const char *bin) 
{
    int i, j;
    j = sizeof(int)*8;
    while ( (j--) && ((*bin=='0') || (*bin=='1')) ) {
        i <<= 1;
        if ( *bin=='1' ) i++;
        bin++;
    }
    return i;
}

int main(void) 
{ 
    char* input = NULL;
    size_t size = 0;

    while ( getline(&input, &size, stdin) > 0 ) {
        printf("%i\n", bin2int(input)); 
    }
    free(input);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Most compilers will optimize a constant multiplication to a shift, when it is faster. And it might not always be. –  b0fh Sep 16 '13 at 21:51
    
A decent compiler –  b0fh Sep 16 '13 at 22:23
    
You're right. However I just cant use a multiplier when I want to shift bits and I cant use shift when I am doing math... It is just a semantic thing that I cant get rid of. –  olivecoder Sep 17 '13 at 12:38
    
Interesting point.. but semantically, we could argue that a multiplication is appropriate here, since it generalizes to bases other than 2 ! –  b0fh Sep 18 '13 at 15:45
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#include <stdio.h>  //printf
#include <string.h> //strlen
#include <stdint.h> //uintX_t or use int instead - depend on platform.

/* reverse string */
char *strrev(char *str){
    int end = strlen(str)-1;
    int start = 0;

    while( start<end ){
        str[start] ^= str[end];
        str[end]   ^= str[start];
        str[start] ^= str[end];
        ++start;
        --end;
    }
    return str;
}


/* transform binary string to integer */
uint32_t binstr2int(char *bs){
    uint32_t ret = 0;
    uint32_t val = 1;

    while(*bs){
       if (*bs++ == '1') ret = ret + val;
       val = val*2;
    }
    return ret;
}

int main(void){
    char binstr[] = "1010101001010101110100010011111"; //1428875423
    printf("Binary: %s, Int: %d\n", binstr, binstr2int(strrev(binstr)));
    return 0;
}
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