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I have 2 questions:

This code:

   struct employee
   {
      char name[20];
      int married :1;
   };

How many does married take in memory?

And if I have multiple bit-sized fields Does it good to put them in the same variable of keep them individual?

like:

struct employee
{
 char name[31];
 int married :1;
 int manager :2;
 int children :4;
};

Or

struct employee
{
 char name[31];
 int flage; /* one bit for married, one for manager, and 4 bits for children */
};

Which one is better in memory usage and why???

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Sorry for another question, but what does the int married : 1; mean? –  lfxgroove Sep 9 '12 at 11:19
    
It is a bit-sized structure field. int married :1; Means I need only one bit from integer variable rather than 32 bits. –  M_E Sep 9 '12 at 11:24
    
You are likely to have billions of bytes in your computer. Why bother trying to save 1 or 2? That is not very productive, and can also introduce extra bugs - like not working for people with more that 16 children. –  Bo Persson Sep 9 '12 at 13:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you use int flage for storing information regarding married manager and children, it MAY take 2 bytes of memory for one object, and every time you have to access a particular information you have to perform bitwise operations on the flage variable. This will thus require some processing.

By using a bitfield, like int married:1; (you better use unsigned int), that means it MAY take just 1 byte of memory, therefore you MAY save memory (supposing your struct is not padded). As a bonus, you can access its bits directly.

So it should be better approach regarding memory and processing.

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This is entirely innacurate. int flage MAY occupy 2 bytes, which is the minimum storage size demanded by the standard, however, it will most likely occupy 4 bytes. You can easily check this with printf("%zu\n", sizeof(int));. As for the the bitfield, it may not really save any memory since its storage will be aligned to a word-boundary (unless you specify otherwise). –  jweyrich Sep 10 '12 at 2:53
    
@jweyrich when i done sizeof(int) i got answer as 2byte and when i done int a :1; sizeof(a) i got answer as 1byte so int part was rightly said by me but use of : might be miss-interpreted by me. As it is taking 1byte space rather thaen 1bit space.So I apologies for the same. but still 1byte is less than 2bytes so a memory efficient. –  Ealge_Rider Sep 10 '12 at 9:48
    
I'd suggest you to update your answer to reflect this. As I said, flage MAY be 2 bytes, while your answer asserts that it WILL be 2 bytes. The bitfield MAY take 1 byte, but will most likely take 4 bytes. When sizeof(name) + sizeof(flage) results in 35, the struct will be padded with 1 extra byte, avoiding the misalignment to the 4-bytes boundary. If you don't want that padding to occur, you can use compiler directives. Note that now sizeof(struct employee) == sizeof(name) + sizeof(flage). Sorry if I'm being too picky. –  jweyrich Sep 10 '12 at 19:36
    
@jweyrich I am using windows XP3 and when i ran your code it shows it takes 2byte for flage and total 33byte only for struct employee. What you are saying I think is based on computer OS which for faster access sometime paddes extra byte. (and as am just a learner so i said what I have learnt from here n there and did not care for detailing.. so sorry. and ll edit my answer to be more precise.) but friend the main Qn (from author) is what to choose from bit sized field or a integer flage? n answering that i thikn i suggested him right only to go for bit sized field, wasnt I? –  Ealge_Rider Sep 11 '12 at 9:15
    
Yes. Although your reasoning was right, your explanation was not, because you were not covering other possibilities. The simple fact that your compiler gives you that result does not guarantee others will get the same. Nothing personal, that's the only reason I started the debate. –  jweyrich Sep 12 '12 at 19:54

It depends on the compiler, and probably also the options you give to the compiler when building.

Packing the fields tightly might decrease access performance while gaining storage efficiency, which is why it can change if you e.g. tell the compiler to optimize for speed.

The bitfields can never occupy less than CHAR_BITS bits in memory, since otherwise each struct instance's starting address wouldn't fall on an exact char address, which it must do.

So the first example:

struct employee
{
    char name[20];
    int married :1;
};

will probably mean sizeof (struct employee) occupies 24 bytes, assuming sizeof (int) is 4 on your system. This would mean that if you added more bitfield members after married, the size wouldn't change until you had added 31 bits of fields.

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Sorry, I don't understand what do you mean?? I am a beginner in C language. –  M_E Sep 9 '12 at 11:22
    
+1. Just for completeness, it may also change with alignment directives (like #pragma pack). –  jweyrich Sep 9 '12 at 11:29

How many does married take in memory?

int : 1 takes one bit of memory in a storage unit of sizeof(int). Note, that because int is signed and the bitfield has only one bit, such a bitfield can take only two values: -1 and 0.

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+1 for the comment about signed 1-bit fields being a bad idea, forgot to include that in my answer. Well spotted. –  unwind Sep 9 '12 at 11:25
    
likewise. nice catch. –  WhozCraig Sep 9 '12 at 11:28

First, placement. structure packing will ultimately determine how much space a struct layout uses. Most compilers will default to packing on a CPU-word size boundary, which is normally 32 bits, so "married" will be 24 bytes large; 20 for the first member, and 32 for the second (even though you're only using one). Check your default packing for this. Adding up to 31 more bits will (should) not increase the structure until you need more space for more bits.

Secondly, the layout of a single flags vs individual bits is a matter of preference. Masking a multi-bit value against a flags member is easy.

if (flags & MY_MASK)

Storing a 3-bit length, a 2 bit length, and a 3 bit length across a single byte is MUCH easier with bit-storage fields

Find out more about structure alignment, packing, etc, at this link, and on more questions/answers on stack overflow.

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Choose whichever is easiest to read, and which captures the intention of your coding most accurately. This micro-optimisation talk is completely out of place. It might become important if ever you are in a performance critical innner- inner- loop, but then other techniques impinge like your algorithm, the cache performance of your CPU, loop unrolling, loop pipelining &c.

Just to re-iterate: code for the person who is going to read your code.

You might even like to consider something like:

struct employee
{
    char name[31];
    bool married;
    enum manager_t manager;
    ...
};

Here the compiler will warn you if you try to assign a bool (say) to an employee::manager.

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