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Given an array with positive and negative integers, move all the odd indexed elements to the left and even indexed elements to the right.

The difficult part of the problem is to do it in-place while maintaining the order.

e.g.

7, 5, 6, 3, 8, 4, 2, 1

The output should be:

5, 3, 4, 1, 7, 6, 8, 2

If the order didn't matter, we could have been used partition() algorithm of quick sort.

How to do it in O( N )?

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1  
O(n) space+time is trivial using two lists. I assume you are looking for O(1) space? –  amit Sep 9 '12 at 11:33
1  
@amit, yes. In-place means O(1) space. –  Aashish Sep 9 '12 at 11:34
2  
This paper describes O(N) in-place algorithm: arxiv.org/abs/0805.1598 –  Evgeny Kluev Sep 9 '12 at 11:42
    
Why did the 7 move to the right? Should odd numbers on the left remain on the left? What do you intend for the output order? This question is not at all clear. –  Adrian McCarthy Oct 10 '12 at 17:38
1  
@AdrianMcCarthy: the question is not about odd/even numbers, but about odd/even-positioned elements. 7 is at even position, so it goes to the right. The problem of rearranging odd/even numbers is discussed in the comments. –  Evgeny Kluev Oct 10 '12 at 18:36
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
  1. Get largest sub-array having size 3k+1
  2. Apply cycle leader algorithm to the parts of this sub-array, starting from positions 1, 3, 9, ... 3k-1: move element to its proper position in sub-array (even-indexed elements to the left of sub-array, odd-indexed - to the right), the replaced element should be also moved to its proper position, etc. until this procedure comes back to the starting position. This paper gives number-theoretic explanation why such selection of starting positions shuffles sub-array to the correct order.
  3. Process the remaining parts of the array recursively, using steps 1 and 2.
  4. Now we only need to join the reordered parts together. Start with the smaller sub-arrays at the end of the whole array. To exchange sub-array halves, use reverse algorithm: reverse(reverse(a), reverse(b)); or, for sub-array halves of equal size, use pair-wise swaps.
  5. Now all even-positioned elements are on the left. To get them on the right, as required, exchange elements i and i+N/2 for all i = 0 .. N/2-1.

Algorithm is in-place, time complexity is O(N).

Example:

0 1 2 3 4  5 6 7 8 9   10 11 (the original array)
0 1 2 3 4  5 6 7 8 9 # 10 11 (split to sub-arrays)
0 2 4 3 8  1 6 5 7 9 # 10 11 (first cycle leader iteration, starting with 1)
0 2 4 6 8  1 3 5 7 9 # 10 11 (second cycle leader iteration, starting with 3)
0 2 4 6 8  9 7 5 3 1 # 10 11(2nd half of 1st part& 1st half of 2nd part reversed)
0 2 4 6 8 10 1 3 5 7    9 11 (both halves reversed together)

Variation of this algorithm, that does not need step 5:

  • On step 1, get largest sub-array having size 3k-1.
  • On step 2, move even-indexed elements to the right of sub-array, odd-indexed - to the left. Use starting positions 0, 2, 8, ... 3k-1-1 for cycle-leader algorithm.

Here is different O(N log N) in-place algorithm, which does not need number-theoretic proofs:

  1. Reinterpret your array as a sequence of single-element 2*2 matrices, transpose these matrices.
  2. Reinterpret the result as a sequence of two-element 2*2 matrices and transpose them.
  3. Continue while matrices size is less than the array size.
  4. Now we only need to join the reordered parts together (exactly as in previous algorithm).
  5. Exchange elements of left and right halves of the array (exactly as in previous algorithm).

Example:

0  1   2 3   4 5   6 7  (the original array)
[0 2] [1 3] [4 6] [5 7] (first transposition)
[0 2] [4 6] [1 3] [5 7] (second transposition)

This problem is just a special case of the In-place matrix transposition.

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Can you please explain how 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 transforms to 0 2 4 3 1 5 6 7 after the first cycle leader iteration? –  Cupidvogel Oct 7 '12 at 20:17
    
@Cupidvogel: 1 goes to its proper place and replaces 4. Then 4 replaces 2. Then 2 goes to the vacant place, previously occupied by 1. All other elements remain in their places. –  Evgeny Kluev Oct 7 '12 at 20:22
    
I just noted that the original array needs the transformations: 0->4,4->6,6->7,7->3,3->1,1->0 and '2->5, 5->2'. As per the paper you suggested, any new permutation is a disjoint set of such cyclic leader rotations. Where does your steps 2-4 fit in? And secondly, is there any guarantee that these rotations won't go for a fairly long time (here it is only 6 and 2 for the 2 sets) so that it no longer remains linear? –  Cupidvogel Oct 8 '12 at 8:30
    
@Cupidvogel: algorithm should move even-positioned elements to the left (which means we need additional block-exchange at the end to satisfy requirements of this question). Also algorithm works only for sizes 3^k - 1, that's why steps 3..4 are needed. Rotations won't go for a fairly long time because each element is moved exactly once and we stop as soon as we get back to starting position. –  Evgeny Kluev Oct 8 '12 at 11:08
    
2 questions. I just noted that even for arrays whose length is not of the form 3^k-1, only step 1 suffices. For example, in the length 10 array '4,7,2,9,8,5,1,3,6,5`, to convert it into the array 7 9 5 3 5 4 2 8 1 6, only 1 cycle is required: 0->5,5->2,2->6,6->8,8->9,9->4,4->7,7->3,3->1 & 1->0, as summarized by i -> L/2 + i/2 when i%2 == 0, else i -> i/2. Steps 3-4 are not required here. And for the given array in question, two sets of disjoint cycles are required. So when does only 1 cycle suffice, and when more than 1 is needed? And if more than 1 is needed, how to know that? –  Cupidvogel Oct 8 '12 at 14:16
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I tried to implement as Evgeny Kluev said, and here is the result:

#pragma once

#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <type_traits>
#include <limits>
#include <deque>
#include <utility>

#include <cassert>

template< typename Iterator >
struct perfect_shuffle_permutation
{

    static_assert(std::is_same< typename std::iterator_traits< Iterator >::iterator_category, std::random_access_iterator_tag >::value,
                  "!");

    using difference_type = typename std::iterator_traits< Iterator >::difference_type;
    using value_type = typename std::iterator_traits< Iterator >::value_type;

    perfect_shuffle_permutation()
    {
        for (difference_type power3_ = 1; power3_ < std::numeric_limits< difference_type >::max() / 3; power3_ *= 3) {
            powers3_.emplace_back(power3_ + 1);
        }
        powers3_.emplace_back(std::numeric_limits< difference_type >::max());
    }

    void
    forward(Iterator _begin, Iterator _end) const
    {
        return forward(_begin, std::distance(_begin, _end));
    }

    void
    backward(Iterator _begin, Iterator _end) const
    {
        return backward(_begin, std::distance(_begin, _end));
    }

    void
    forward(Iterator _begin, difference_type const _size) const
    {
        assert(0 < _size);
        assert(_size % 2 == 0);
        difference_type const left_size_ = *(std::upper_bound(powers3_.cbegin(), powers3_.cend(), _size) - 1);
        cycle_leader_forward(_begin, left_size_);
        difference_type const rest_ = _size - left_size_;
        if (rest_ != 0) {
            Iterator middle_ = _begin + left_size_;
            forward(middle_, rest_);
            std::rotate(_begin + left_size_ / 2, middle_, middle_ + rest_ / 2);
        }
    }

    void
    backward(Iterator _begin, difference_type const _size) const
    {
        assert(0 < _size);
        assert(_size % 2 == 0);
        difference_type const left_size_ = *(std::upper_bound(powers3_.cbegin(), powers3_.cend(), _size) - 1);
        std::rotate(_begin + left_size_ / 2, _begin + _size / 2, _begin + (_size + left_size_) / 2);
        cycle_leader_backward(_begin, left_size_);
        difference_type const rest_ = _size - left_size_;
        if (rest_ != 0) {
            Iterator middle_ = _begin + left_size_;
            backward(middle_, rest_);
        }
    }

private :

    void
    cycle_leader_forward(Iterator _begin, difference_type const _size) const
    {
        for (difference_type leader_ = 1; leader_ != _size - 1; leader_ *= 3) {
            permutation_forward permutation_(leader_, _size);
            Iterator current_ = _begin + leader_;
            value_type first_ = std::move(*current_);
            while (++permutation_) {
                assert(permutation_ < _size);
                Iterator next_ = _begin + permutation_;
                *current_ = std::move(*next_);
                current_ = next_;
            }
            *current_ = std::move(first_);
        }
    }

    void
    cycle_leader_backward(Iterator _begin, difference_type const _size) const
    {
        for (difference_type leader_ = 1; leader_ != _size - 1; leader_ *= 3) {
            permutation_backward permutation_(leader_, _size);
            Iterator current_ = _begin + leader_;
            value_type first_ = std::move(*current_);
            while (++permutation_) {
                assert(permutation_ < _size);
                Iterator next_ = _begin + permutation_;
                *current_ = std::move(*next_);
                current_ = next_;
            }
            *current_ = std::move(first_);
        }
    }

    struct permutation_forward
    {

        permutation_forward(difference_type const _leader, difference_type const _size)
            : leader_(_leader)
            , current_(_leader)
            , half_size_(_size / 2)
        { ; }

        bool
        operator ++ ()
        {
            if (current_ < half_size_) {
                current_ += current_;
            } else {
                current_ = 1 + (current_ - half_size_) * 2;
            }
            return (current_ != leader_);
        }

        operator difference_type () const
        {
            return current_;
        }

    private :

        difference_type const leader_;
        difference_type current_;
        difference_type const half_size_;

    };

    struct permutation_backward
    {

        permutation_backward(difference_type const _leader, difference_type const _size)
            : leader_(_leader)
            , current_(_leader)
            , half_size_(_size / 2)
        { ; }

        bool
        operator ++ ()
        {
            if ((current_ % 2) == 0) {
                current_ /= 2;
            } else {
                current_ = (current_ - 1) / 2 + half_size_;
            }
            return (current_ != leader_);
        }

        operator difference_type () const
        {
            return current_;
        }

    private :

        difference_type const leader_;
        difference_type current_;
        difference_type const half_size_;

    };

    std::deque< difference_type > powers3_;

};
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I think this implementation has O(N log N) complexity because you exchange sub-arrays starting from larger one (so you move a growing sub-array on each iteration). –  Evgeny Kluev Nov 9 '12 at 19:58
    
Another way is to keep the length of all the subarrays and then do backward motion with reverse function. But this violates the requirement O(log log n) memory –  Orient Nov 10 '12 at 5:48
    
Or, we can calculate the (growing) length of the next small subarray every step back - it will be O (log n log n) time additionaly. –  Orient Nov 10 '12 at 6:00
    
Please, tell me how to perform step 4 with O(n) time complexity and O(log log n) memory? –  Orient Nov 10 '12 at 8:19
    
You just shown two ways to do it without violating any requirements. Second one, lengths recalculation on each step, requires O((log N)^3) additional time. But is is less than O(N), so the whole algorithm still has O(N) time complexity. First one, "keep the length of all the sub-arrays" should be corrected: keep only the number of sub-arrays of each size (0 .. 3), which means 2 * log N bits. You could pack these bits into a pair of integers. –  Evgeny Kluev Nov 10 '12 at 8:36
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I modified the code here to get this algorithm:

void PartitionIndexParity(T arr[], size_t n)
{
    using std::swap;
    for (size_t shift = 0, k; shift != n; shift += k)
    {
        k = (size_t)pow(3, ceil(log(n - shift) / log(3)) - 1) + 1;
        for (size_t i = 1; i < k; i *= 3)  // cycle-leader algorithm
        {
            size_t j = i;
            do { swap(arr[(j = j / 2 + (j % 2) * (k / 2)) + shift], arr[i + shift]); } while (j != i);
        }

        for (size_t b = shift / 2, m = shift, e = shift + (k - k / 2), i = m; shift != 0 && k != 0; )  // or just use std::rotate(arr, b, m, e)
        {
            swap(arr[b++], arr[i++]);
            if (b == m && i == e) { break; }
            if (b == m) { m = i; }
            else if (i == e) { i = m; }
        }
    }
}
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