Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <atomic>
std::atomic<int> outside(1);
class A{
  std::atomic<int> inside(1);  // <--- why not allowed ?
};

error:

prog.cpp:4:25: error: expected identifier before numeric constant
prog.cpp:4:25: error: expected ',' or '...' before numeric constant

In VS11

C2059: syntax error : 'constant'
share|improve this question
    
Try inside = std::atomic<int>(0); –  user744186 Sep 9 '12 at 12:31
    
I think there is a historic problem with () inside the class. Have you tried = instead of braces ? –  iammilind Sep 9 '12 at 12:32
    
@iammilind guess what. It works outside but not inside..... –  acidzombie24 Sep 9 '12 at 12:34
    
related and other one. –  iammilind Sep 9 '12 at 12:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In-class initializers do not support the (e) syntax of initialization because the committee members that designed it worried about potential ambiguities (For example, the well-known T t(X()); declaration would be ambiguous and does not specify an initialization but declares a function with an unnamed parameter).

You can say

class A{
    std::atomic<int> inside{1};
};

Alternatively a default value can be passed in the constructor

class A {
  A():inside(1) {}
  std::atomic<int> inside;
};
share|improve this answer
2  
although correct ATM both gcc and VC11 doesn't support {1} :(. +1 –  acidzombie24 Sep 9 '12 at 12:33
1  
Non-static data member initializers (N2756) are supported by Clang 3.0 and upwards. –  Matthieu M. Sep 9 '12 at 12:36
    
@MatthieuM. I'm on windows :(. My favorite IDE is VS and i like clang but it doesnt support windows –  acidzombie24 Sep 9 '12 at 12:41
    
@acidzombie24: I can understand the appeal of VS (especially its debugger). As for Windows support in clang, it's moving along but yes, unfortunately, it's still lagging behind. Personally (having a Windows computer at home too), I use codeblocks for edition on a shared folder... and I have a Ubuntu VM for compiling/running my programs :) –  Matthieu M. Sep 9 '12 at 12:44
1  
This is C++11 syntax, and it hasn't made it into many compilers yet. –  Pete Becker Sep 9 '12 at 16:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.